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The Debts and Houses of the Jews of Hereford in 1290

B. Lionel Abrahams

<plain_text><page sequence="1">THE DEBTS AND HOUSES OF THE JEWS OF HEREFORD IN 1290. By B. LIONEL ABRAHAMS. When the history of the Jews of England before the Expulsion comes to be written, it will probably be found to derive its chief interest not, like that of the mediasval Jews of southern Europe, from the literary and philosophical importance of the period dealt with, nor, like that of the Jews of central Europe, from stories of the daring and suffering of martyrs who died for their faith, but rather from the comparative ful? ness and clearness with which the historian will be able to describe the relations of the members of the Jewish communities to the people around them and to one another. Mr. Joseph Jacobs and Mr. M. D. Davis have accomplished much work that will help our future historian to do justice to his subject, and I trust that the documents which I am now enabled to publish may serve, in some slight measure, towards the same end. First of all it is necessary to explain how the lists of the debts and houses of the Jews of Hereford came into existence. When the Jews were expelled from England, all the property that they left be? hind them fell into the hands of the king. It was of two kinds, firstly, houses and tenements that they had held in fee or for a term of years, and secondly, bonds for money or kind that had been executed in their favour by Christians. Some of this property the king granted by way of gift to his friends ; some he expressed his intention of using for pious purposes; the greater part, no doubt, he intended to keep for himself.1 But, in order that he might know the exact amount at his disposal, he issued, a few months after the Expulsion, writs ordering the sheriffs of the counties in which Jews had been residing to send to the Treasurer and Barons of the Exchequer at Westminster the official chests in which counterparts of Jewish bonds had been preserved, and to 1 Tovey, Anglia Judaica, 235. Public Record Office, Exchequer, Q. JR. Miscellanea. Jews, 557. 9.</page><page sequence="2">THE DEBTS AND HOUSES OF THE JEWS OF HEREFORD IN 1290. 137 require the chirograph ers, or keepers of the chests, to attend at the Exchequer in person, bringing with them any bonds or deeds relating to the Jews which they might have in their custody, even though the counterparts of them were not contained in the official chests. The sheriffs were at the same time to inquire what houses and tenements were in the possession of the Jews of each county at the time of the Expulsion, under what tenure they were held, and what was the value of them to the king, now that the rights of the Jews in them had reverted to him. When they had collected all the informa? tion on the subject that they could get, they were on the king's behalf to seize the houses, to let them to new tenants on the most favourable conditions that could be obtained, and to send to the Exchequer a full report of their proceedings. Lastly, to ensure that nothing that had, through the expulsion of the Jews, become the king's property should fall into other hands, the sheriffs were to proclaim throughout their counties that whoever had in his possession any goods or chattels belonging to a Jew should bring them to the Exchequer on the same day on which the chirographers were to appear there ; and any one who failed to do so was to be declared liable, on conviction, to the loss of his life, his limbs, and all his property in the kingdom.1 No doubt, in all the counties in which Jews had lived, the king's orders were duly carried out, the proclamations were made, the houses were seized by the sheriffs, and the chests were duly sent to West? minster. At any rate, there are preserved in the Public Record Office, at the present day, the returns concerning the houses of the Jews in many of the towns in which they had lived, and the lists drawn up by the officers of the Exchequer of the bonds presented by the chirographers. The extant lists and returns relate to the following places : Bedford, Bristol, Cambridge, Canterbury, Colchester, Devizes, Exeter, Hereford, Ipswich, Lincoln, Northampton, Norwich, Nottingham, Oxford, South? ampton, Stamford, Winchester, York. I have chosen for immediate publication those which relate to Hereford, because of the Jewry of that town, as of the others of the West of England, no connected account has been written, though the information concerning it is, in spite of its scantiness, of considerable historical interest. I do not 1 Exchequer, Q. R. Miscellanea, Jews, 557. 9.</page><page sequence="3">138 THE DEBTS AND HOUSES undertake to give with any completeness all that there is to say about the Jewry of Hereford, but I wish to show, partly from the accom? panying documents and partly from other sources, what kind of infor? mation about its history and the lives of its inhabitants is at the disposal of the historian. The Jewry of Hereford seems to have come into existence at the end of the twelfth century. There is every reason to believe that at the accession of Richard I. it was small in numbers and of recent foundation, if, indeed, it existed at all. For in the accounts of the attacks which were made on the chief Jewish settlements in England at that time, it is not once mentioned. And when, in 1194, the Jews of England had to make a general gift to the Exchequer, the list of the contributions from Hereford contained the names of only twenty persons, who, among them, gave ?31. 3s. 10d., the amount of the whole gift being ?1,803. 7s. 7d., and the number of contributors being 271.1 The neighbouring Jewry of Gloucester was evidently much more im? portant, since forty-five of its members gave ?237. 15s. 4d. ; it was also much older, and had enjoyed as early as 1168 the distinction of producing a boy-martyr.2 The Hereford Jewry, however, must soon have attained to a certain importance, since, when we next hear of it, it is the subject of an interesting quarrel between the royal power and the Bishop of the diocese. The Bishops of Hereford possessed from very early times extensive jurisdiction over what was called the Bishop's Fee, a district including nearly half of the city and a considerable portion of the suburbs.8 Within that district they had the right of trying offenders, and of committing them to the episcopal prison. The Jews, of course, being under the special protection of the king, were uot subject to any local jurisdictions ; but the Bishop of Hereford, irritated, like the authorities of many of the towns, by the existence of a privilege which diminished his power and dignity, attempted to exercise the same jurisdiction over the Jews as over the other 1 J. Jacobs, Jews of Angevin England, 162-4. 2 Hart, Historia et Cartularium, Monasterii S. Petri Gloucestrice, L, 21. 1 Duncumb, History of Hereford, I., 293-4.</page><page sequence="4">OF THE JEWS OF HEREFORD IN 1290. 139 inhabitants of the Bishop's Fee. What measures he took we do not know, but in the writ which, at the beginning of the reign of Henry III., was sent to the Sheriff of Hereford, as to the other sheriffs of counties, ordering him to protect the Jews in his county from violence, the king's guardian showed their determination to uphold the royal claim to the exercise of undivided rights over the Jews. "You shall proclaim," says the writ, "throughout all the district under your charge that we have assured to the Jews our peace. No action to the contrary taken by the Bishop of Hereford is of any effect, for our Jews are no concern of his. . . . You shall not permit the Jews to be impleaded in any ecclesiastical court on account of any debt. All these things you shall do as they were done in the days of our father John."1 The Jews, apparently, came to no harm from the interference of the Bishop. Probably the lay magnates of the neighbourhood were their friends and sometimes took part in their business ; for though there is no extant record to prove this, there is, among the decrees of a synod held in the neighbouring diocese of Worcester, a denunciation by the Bishop of the conduct of those Christians who, while not practising usury under their own name, entrusted their money to Jews for the purpose, and acted as sleeping partners in their business.2 The Earl of Gloucester is known to have bought from one Jew, apparently of Gloucestershire, the right to collect the debts due to him.3 What happened in Worcestershire and in Glouces? tershire happened no doubt in Herefordshire as well. At the time of the Barons' Wars, the Jewry oE Hereford, unlike many others, escaped attack. To a certain extent, indeed, its position must have been improved by the events of the war, for the Jewry of Worcester, its neighbour and no doubt its rival, was attacked and plundered in 1263, and never recovered from the loss that it suffered.4 In 1275 the staff of registrars and the chests for the deposit of bonds which had hitherto been maintained at Worcester, were removed by 1 Tovey, Anglia Judaica, 78-9. 2 Wilkins, Magnce Britannia Concilia, I., 675-6. 3 Calendar of Patent Rolls from 1281 to 1292, p. 81. 4 Annales Ifonastici, IV., 419.</page><page sequence="5">140 THE DEBTS AND HOUSES the king's orders to Hereford,1 a measure which completed the destruction of the Worcester Jewry, by the absorption of what remained of it in that of Hereford. Till the end of the reign of Henry III., the richer Jews of Here? ford were, as far as we have any means of knowing, all money-lenders, lending occasionally to tradesmen in the city, but usually to land? holders and farmers on the security of their land. They, no doubt, received regular interest so long as the money due to them was unpaid, and they had no reason to be dissatisfied with the chance of ultimate realisation of their debts, since in default of payment they could obtain possession of the land pledged to them as security. But the accession to power of Edward I. completely changed this state of things. Even before his father's death Edward had helped to secure the passing of a statute which imposed on Jewish money? lenders conditions so stringent as to make it all but impossible for them to carry on their trade ; and in 1275 he carried to its natural issue the scheme of legislation thus initiated by forbidding usury altogether.2 Some years later he revoked in part the statute of 1275, and allowed money-lending at interest to be resumed, but again under very strict conditions.3 The list of the Hereford bonds shows very clearly the effects of this legislation. The bonds of the old chest, all belonging to a period before 1277, are almost all for money lent at usury. The greater number of those of the new chest are ostensibly for the delivery of corn or wool. It is, of course, possible that the bonds of the latter class all represent genuine trading transactions. In that case it would follow that the richer Jews of Hereford took to trade when usury was forbidden, and kept to it when, though the actual prohibition was removed, it was made by Edward's legislation much less profitable 1 Papers of the Anglo-Jewish Historical Exhibition, pp. 187-8. 2 See The Expulsion of the Jews from England in 1290, now appearing in the Jewish Quarterly Review. 3 The partial revocation of the Statute of 1275 is contained in the Chapitles tuchaunz le Gywerie, first printed by Dr. Gross in Papers of the Anglo-Jewish Historical Exhibition, pp. 219-224. The date of it is in all probability shortly before 1283, the year in which the new chest was opened at Hereford. New chests were opened at several other towns about the same time.</page><page sequence="6">OF THE JEWS OF HEREFORD IN 1290. 141 and safe than it had 'been. No doubt this really happened to a certain extent, and the existence of some of the bonds for corn and wool is to be explained by the supposition that the Jews, according to the practice of the time, paid in advance for specified quantities of produce to be delivered to them out of the yield of a future harvest. But it will be noticed that many of these bonds were executed as early as 1285, whereas the contracts of which they were the instru? ments, were, as is proved by their presence in the chest after the Expulsion, still unfulfilled in 1290. The delay seems extraordinarily long, and therefore it may be conjectured that bonds for the delivery of corn and wool may, in some cases, have been used as a means of enabling Jews to lend money at interest in defiance of the conditions imposed by the law, and that the intention of the contracting parties was that repayment should ultimately be made in money. Whatever may have been the nature of the business to which the entries on our list refer, the persons who on either side were parties to it were certainly of good position. Among the Christians we find Miles Fichard, sheriff of the county in 1300 ; Walter Hakelutel or Hakluyt, sheriff in 1308 ; R. de Chaundos, sheriff in 1312 ; John le Balun, lord of the manor of Marcle ; Henry de Hereford, knight, owner of many estates and benefactor of abbeys ; William de Bliss, knight ; John le Brun, who married the heiress of the manor of Sollers Hope ; Nicholas de Trillec, bearer of the same name as a bishop of Hereford in the fourteenth century ; Richard de Kynardesley, whose father, Hugh de Kynardesley, had been sheriff of the county in 1240; and, in addition to these, members of the families of de Penbrugge, de Burghill, de Sollers, Rosseil, Caple, de Siptune, de Hurtesle, le Archer, Devereux, Gernun, Elmerugge, Mucegros, de Furches, de la Mere, all of which were of the land-holding class, some of old descent and many of high standing in the county.1 On the other side it is evident that the creditors who are enumerated were nearly all members of the aristocracy of the Jewry, which, as we know, was of some importance, and had social as well as business relations with the Christians of the city. For in 1286 one of the chief Jewish families of the city gave a wedding feast with 1 Duncumb, History of Hereford. Phillot, Diocesan History of Hereford.</page><page sequence="7">142 THE DEBTS AND HOUSES " displays of silk and cloth of gold, horsemanship or an equestrian procession, stage-playing, sports and minstrelsy," all in so magnificent a style as to induce many of the citizens to attend it, though Bishop Swinfield had threatened to excommunicate any Christian who should be so impious as to accept the hospitality of Jews.1 A glance at our list will be enough to show how small was the Jewish aristocracy, and how great a portion of the wealth of the Jewry was in its hands. Now, when it is remembered that the Jewish population of England at the time of the Expulsion was more than 16,000 ;2 that the number of the towns in which Jews were living at the time was not more than twenty, if as many ; and that Hereford was, in the wealth, and probably in the number, of its Jewish inhabitants, among those of the first rank, it becomes clear that in ail probability there was, in addition to, and far outnumbering, the families of which we know anything, a large class of poor Jews in Hereford. It may have been for their protection that the king appointed in 1282 twenty-four burgesses to act as guardians of the Jews of the city, and to make public proclamation that none should harm them.3 But we know nothing of the pursuits of these poor Jews. We are in the same condition of ignorance concerning them as concerning the poor Jews of Continental Europe in the Middle Ages. We know, for example, that there were hundreds of thousands of Jews in Spain and France and Germany. But when we read the chief sources of Jewish history for the period, the martyrologies, we learn nothing about the poor. We are told of men who met death bravely and cheerfully "for the Name's sake," but they are all learned or highly placed in the Synagogue. Of other classes nothing is said. So it is with the history of the English Jews. Perhaps the historian of the future, if ever he looks at the Hereford list, may be glad to be reminded by it, as he must be, of this gap in the information at his command. There are other points of less importance which are illustrated by the documents now printed. One is, that priest-ridden as the 1 Boll of the Household Expenses of Bishop Swmfield (Camden Society), c, ci. 2 Flores Historiarum (Rolls Series), III., 70. 3 Calendar of Patent Bolls from 1281 to 1292, p. 15.</page><page sequence="8">OF THE JEWS OF HEREFORD IN 1290. 143 Christians of the Middle Ages may have been, they were not prevented from dealing with the Jews on Sunday and Christmas Eve. Nor, indeed, was this a sign of great laxity, for there exists in the Household Roll of Bishop Swinfield an entry which shows that an archdeacon of the thirteenth century went on a Sunday to a banker in London, there transacted some business for the see with which he was connected, and reported his proceedings to his bishop.1 The Jews also may, perhaps, not have been so strict in their observances as mediaeval Jews are generally thought to have been, for one of the Hereford bonds was executed on a Saturday. Another striking fact concerning the list is that eight of the creditors mentioned in it are women. This is only natural, for in the Middle Ages women had every opportunity of carrying on business. In London, for example, a married woman who followed a craft without the help and interference of her husband was, according to the regulations and customs of the City, regarded as independent of her husband with respect to all that concerned her craft.2 A last remark that I would make is that the bonds were evidently all drawn up in Latin, not, like those published by Mr. M. D. Davis, in Hebrew. This is proved by the use of the Saints' days for dates. Both of the lists, of which abstracts are given, are contained in the series of MSS. in the Public Record Office known as Queen's Remembrancer's Miscellanea, Jews. The list of debts is No. 557/16 in the series, and the list of houses is No. 557/11 supplemented by No. 557/9. 1 Roll of Household Expenses of Bishop Swinfield, 127. 2 Munimenta Gildhallce Londoniensis (Rolls Series), I., 204-205; III., 38-39.</page><page sequence="9">144 THE DEBTS AND HOUSES LIST OF THE DEBTS OWING TO THE JEWS OF HEREFORD WHICH WERE SEIZED BY EDWARD I. AT THEIR EXPULSION IN 1290. The names of those places which I have been able to identify are given in their modern spelling", the others are printed in italics and spelt as in the Manuscript. The price of corn, wherever it is mentioned in the list, is half a mark per quarter. Aaron, Son of Elias le Blund of Hereford. From the Old Chest. ?30 St. Nicholas' Day, 47 Henry III. ?20 Richard Pauncef ot William de Bliss, knight William de Solle William de Solle Robert de Mucegros of Bishop's Frome William Mael, citizen of Hereford William de Solle William de Solle, John le Aumb leor, chaplain of Handley William Mandut, Lord of Bulley in Gloucestershire Robert de Weston of Preston William, son of Roger le Mercer John Dorlone William Mael, citizen of Hereford Robert of Weston in the Forest of Dean Roger de la Felde of Banham, Ralph de Hasel Aubrey del Park David Morewight David Morewight of Dewchurch Wednesday before Easter, 49 Henry III. 10 marks, Thursday before St. Lucy, 1 qr. of corn 50 Henry III. 10 marks Monday after St. Denis, 50 Henry III. 155. Eve of Holy Cross Day, 51 Henry III. ?8 Morrow of St. Edmund King, 53 Henry III. 20 marks Morrow of St. Nicholas, 53 Henry III. 10 marks, Eve of St. Laurence, 53 4 geese Henry III. 17 marks Annunciation Day, 54 Henry III. 3} marks Friday before St. Laurence, 54 Henry III. 10 marks Eve of St. Luke, 54 Henry III. 40,?. Easter Week, 55 Henry III. 100*. Morrow of Finding of Cross, 55 Henry III. 6 marks, Eve of Ho1 y Cross, 55 Henry 1 qr. of corn III. 8 marks Morrow of St. Andrew Apostle, 55 Henry III. 4 marks, 2 Eve of SS. Peter and Paul, 55 "truges"of corn Henry III. 2 marks Morrow of Holy Cross Day, 56 Henry III. 2 marks Morrow of Michaelmas, 56 Henry III.</page><page sequence="10">OF THE JEWS OF HEREFORD IN 1290. 145 Boger Peytevyn of Marston, John 8 marks Cache of Hinton Reginald Rossell, son of Henry ?10 Rossell of Hereford William Dames 40*. David, son of Richard de Bires pestr' Richard de Ohaundres of Wil maston William de Solle William de SoUe, Philip de la Hulle, Roger de la More of Castle Frome Adam, son of John de W?tune of Dymock Roger of Colwall Bartholomew del Park Marescall John of Whitney, Richard Duners of Chaunston John le Annblur Sayell Adam, son of John de Wilton of Dumnee William Mael of Hereford J ohn, son of Miles of Wormbridge Henry Hichel of Clehonger William de Mael Walter le Plain of Morant, Walter Herdeshope John Cache of Newton, Roger Peytevyn of Marston, William, son of Hugh of Marston Stephen the Smith atte Woclyate and Richard Forestarius of Monkland Robert of Weston 40s., 4 " truges of corn 30*. 12 marks, 4 qrs. of corn 20 marks, 6 qrs. of corn 10 marks 50*. 6 marks, \ qr. corn, 4 geese 12 marks, \ qr. corn 6 marks, 8 shillings 14 marks, 6 shillings 4 marks 2 marks 4 marks ?40 2 marks 100*. 40*. 10 marks John Rigge of Sutton, Henry of 4 marks Sutton Robert, son of Robert of Weston VOL. I ?10 Morrow of Michaelmas, 56 Henry III. Friday in Easter Week, 56 Henry III. Morrow of Sund ay after Easter, 55 Henry III. " Tuesday before St. Ethelbert King, 56 Henry III. Eve of St. Ethelbert, 56 Henry III. Morrow of Easter, 56 Henry III. Sunday after St. Giles, 56 Henry III. Morrow of St, Martin, 57 Henry III. Eve of St. Martin, 57 Henry III. Morrow of AH Souls, 58 Henry III. Finding of the Cross, 1 Edward I. Beheading of St. J ohn Baptist, 1 Edward I, Morrow of St. Mark, \ Edward I. Eve of St. James, 1 Edward I. St. Mark's Day, 1 Edward I. Eve of Nativity of the Virgin, 1 Edward I. Morrow of St. Barnabas, 1 Edward I. Monday after Translation of St. Thomas, 1 Edward I. Eve of Purification, 1 IJdward I. Friday after Easter, \ Edward I. St. Ethelbert's Fairs, 1 Edward I. Eve of Purification, 1 Edward I. Morrow of St. Mark, 1 Edward I.</page><page sequence="11">146 THE DEBTS AND HOUSES Henry, son of Henry de Penbrugge ?60 Thomas Parys of Pipe Walter of Mainestune1 Robert de la Birges William de Trumpington William de Trumpington John, son of Walter of Marden Robert Mucegros of Bishop's Frome Richard of Peterchurch, Walter son of Reyner John, son of Roger Peytefin of Marston, and Roger his brother Walter, son of Reiner of Straddell, Roger son of John de Wirgeb' 2 marks 40*. 40*. 4 marks Eve of St. Laurence, 1 Edward I. Eve of the Epiphany, 1 Edward I. Easter Week, 2 Edward I. Eve of the Purification, 2 Edward I. Eve of St. Martin, 2 Edward I. ?20 and J- Eve of St. Denis, 2 Edward I. qr. of corn 605. Lucy, Morrow of St. Edward I. 405. Morrow of Michaelmas, 2 Edward I. ?6 Morrow of Translation of St. Thomas Martyr, 2 Edward I. 2 marks Thursday before Easter, 2 Edward I. William of Burcote, John le Verreor 545., 4 geese St. Thomas the Apostle, 2 Edward I. Adam Botiller Pauncef ot 1 mark Richard de Hurtesle, knight 6 marks G-eoffrey of Broomfield 2 marks William de Penbrugge 1005. Roger leVinur of Lidney, William 205. de la Pole of PlkesV John of Marden ?12 Walter de Eardeshope 305. and 1 qr. of corn Nicholas, son of Adam de Siptune 405. Hugh, son of Roger of Hinton in 2 marks Peterchurch Eve of St Peter in Cathedra, 2 Edward I. The Week of Whitsuntide, 2 Edward I. The day on which is sung " Rejoice, Jerusalem," 2 Edward I. Eve of St. Denis, 2 Edward I. Eve of St. James Apostle, 2 Edward I. All Saints' Eve, 2 Edward I. Eve of St. Bartholomew, 2 Edward I. Octaves of the Purification, 2 Edward I. Eve of SS. Philip and James Apostles, 2 Edward I. 1 A place called Manetune in Herefordshire is mentioned in Domesday (Duncumb, Hereford, 1. 65), but cannot now be identified. Perhaps Mainestr* or Mainestune was the same place, or perhaps Mainestune is the same as Munstone.</page><page sequence="12">OF THE JEWS OF HEREFORD IN 1290 Walter le Neyr of Mainestr'1 50??. 147 Ralph of Munsley, William de Solle, and Roger de Senewell of Solle Philip de la Hulle of Weston Adam, son of John de Wylton of Dymock William, son of John le Brun of Catynton William Manlagh of Straddel John, son of Robert of Weston in the Forest of Dean David de Burghill Nich' Wase of Ferne Richard de Hurtesle, knight Richard, son of Richard de Hurtesle Alex, le Marescall of Lincestre Hugh Baudewyn of Byf ord Arnold de Grimscote, John le Caret, William Gerard, all of Marcle William de Rokeley of Staunton Walter of Brockhampton John Fremon of Stoke Lacy Roger le Waleys of Dorstone. Walter Kanne of Caple Roger de Eherton' of Bodenham William de Penbrugge Symon, son of William de Solers of Bo rent"1 50??. Eve of St. Nicholas, 2 Edward I. 12 marks Morrow of St. Laurence, 2 Edward I. 40*. SS. Peter and Paul. 2 Edward I. 30 marks Eve of St. Martin, 2 Edward I. 5 marks, \ Morrow of St. David, 2 qr. of corn Edward I. 205. Easter Week, 2 Edward I. 12 marks Morrow of the Sunday after Easter, 3 Edward 1. 5 marks and Eve of St. Martin, 3 Edward 1 qr. of corn I. 2 marks Morrow of the Annunciation, 3 Edward I. 1005. and 1 Eve of St. Peter in Cathedra, soam of corn 3 Edward I. 10 marks, 6 Eve of St. Laurence, 3 Edward qrs. of corn I. 2\ marks Morrow of the Purification, 3 Edward I. 4 silver Morrow of St. Nicholas, 3 marks Edward I. 6 marks St. Agatha's Day, 3 Edward I. 4 marks Morrow of St. John Baptist, 3 Edward I. 2 marks Morrow of Ascension Day, 3 Edward I. 2 marks Eve of St. Margaret, 3 Edward I. 2 marks Morrow of St. Peter ad Vin cula, 3 Edward I. 505. Eve of St. James, 3 Edward I. 605. Eve of Whitsunday, 3 Edward I. 8 marks Morrow of Palm Sunday, 3 Edward I. 4 marks St. Denis Day, 3 Edward T, 1 Walter de Neyr is no doubt the same person of Walter le Blake, or black, of Mainestune, who appears lower down as a creditor of Elias son of Aaron. 2 Perhaps Dorrington in Shropshire. L 2</page><page sequence="13">148 THE DEBTS AND HOUSES Thomas de Wyk of Garway 8 marks Morrow of Dedication of Here? ford Church, 3 Edward I. John Daniel ?20 St. Francis Day, 3 Edward I. Henry, son of William de Solers 22 marks, 2 April 1, 3 Edward I. qrs. of corn John Daniel 20 marks Morrow of St. Mary Magdalene 3 Edward I. Roger de la More of Castle Frome 2J marks Morrow of St. Barnabas, 3 Edward I. Walter Ouerset ?15. 4*. and Eve of St. Mark, 3 Edward I. 2 qrs. of corn Robert de Chaundres of Strong efor ? 60*. Eve of Annunciation, 3, Edward I. Nich', son of Nich' de Cuerewas 40*. Eve of St. Peter in Cathedra, 3 Edward I. Roger Yue of Clehonger 28 marks Eve of St. Martin, 3 Edward I. John de Balun, lord of Marcle ?50 and one Eve of St. Laurence, 3 robe with hood Edward I. Hugb, son of Nicholas Devereux of 6 marks Eve of St. John the Bapt^t, 4 Chaunston Edward I. Peter, son of Hughle New of Caple 4 marks St. Denis' Day, 4 Edward I. Hugh Baudewyn of Byford, Nich' 13 marks, Morrow of the Nativity of the son of Nich' de Seculer, Bast" \ qr. of corn Virgin, 4 Edward I. Roger de Vinclegh 2J marks Morrow of St. Denis, 4 Edward I. John, son of Richard Rumel ?45,2 qrs. Morrow of Holy Cross Day, of corn 4 Edward I. Richard, son of Roger of Clehonger 40*. Morrow of St. Denis, 4 Edward I. William de la Mere 4 marks Michaelmas, 4 Edward I. Hugh Pantif of Stanford Regis 16^ marks, October 3rd, 4 Edward I. 1 qr. of corn, 2 geese John, son of Robert of Weston 14 marks Michaelmas, 4 Edward I. in the Forest of Dean John, son of Richard Daniel 100*. Morrow of St. Laurence, 4 Edward I. From the New Chest. William de la More of Staunton 30 qrs. of corn The day of St. Andrew the Apostle, 11 Edward I. John of Swanston, Robert Bensire, lOOqrs. of corn Morrow of St. John the Walter Oversee Baptist, 12 Edward I. Nich' de Sarweton of Pencombe 20 qrs. of The day of St. Peter ad Vincula Parish. corn at J mark 13 Edward I. a qr. Stephen le Paumer of Sutton, 60 qrs. of corn Tuesday, St. Denis' Day, 13 Richard de Crowenhull, Stephen Edward I. Tre welone, William de Gardiner William, son of John the Clerk of Sutton</page><page sequence="14">OF THE JEWS OF HEREFORD IN 1290. 149 Nich' le Archer, son and heir of 200 qrs. of Chile of August, 13 Edward I. Lord Nich' le Archer of corn Tarrington Laurence de Hounaldewode, Wrena- 20 qrs. of corn The Tuesday after the day of cus of Hagley and Nich' de St. John ante portam Sparewoton Latinam, 14 Edward I. Roger de Caple of Upton, and 40 qrs. of corn Sunday, Eve of the Annuncia Walter Kanne of Fawley, clerk Walter de Frene of Sutton, John de la Lone, Robert Jurdan, William Balle, John Hereberd, William, son of John the Clerk, Walter, son of Hugh, Richard de Crowenhull of Sutton gh Baude wyn of By ford, and Nich', son of Nich' le Seculer tion, 14 Edward I. 19? marks Sunday after St. Ethelbert's Day, 14 Edward I. Hug Morrow of St. Peter Vincula, 14 Edward I. 5 marks and 1 qr. of corn Roger Fremon, son of William 30 qrs. of corn Tuesday after St. Augustine's Fremon of Fremington, Nich' Day, 14 Edward I. of Shobdon, Andrew, son of Ivo of Marden John, son of Lord Walter de 20 qrs. of corn Tuesday before Easter, 14 Balun, Stephen Cocus of Marcle Edward I. Isabel, formerly wife of Simon de 6 score, and Friday after St. Barnabas' Day, Hommo of Clehonger, Richard, 8 qrs. of corn 14 Edward I. son and heir of the same Simon William of Weston, William le 40 qrs. of corn Monday after St. Laurence's Bailliff of Priytlynton, John Day, 14 Edward I. de Boclonde of 10 qrs. of corn Sunday, morrow of St. of Margaret's, 14 Edward I. and heir Pichard of Miles Pichard, son Lord Roger Staunton John of Swanston, Robert Bensir', Robert Oversee Robert Boter, son and heir William Boter Andrew de Chaundos, Walter Movem' son of Roger Movem' Roger le Waleys of Dorstone John Fremon of Stoke Lacy John of Marden 35 marks and Monday, morrow of Sunday 30 qrs. of corn after Easter, 14 Edward I. 9 marks Sunday before St. Matthew's Day, 15 Edward I. de 50 qrs. of com Sunday after Epiphany, 15 de Edward I. 6 marks and Tuesday in Easter week, 16 2 qrs. of corn Edward I. 20s. and 2 qrs. Eve of SS. Peter and Paul, 16 Edward I. Wednesday before the An? nunciation, 17 Edward I. John, son of David of Burghill John of Caple, son and heir of Walter, Lord of Caple of corn 45 marks, 28 qrs. of corn, 24 cheeses, 4 waggon loads of hay 16 marks Wednesday before Easter, 17 Edward I. ?45 Wednesday after Whitsunday, 18 Edward I.</page><page sequence="15">150 THE DEBTS AND HOUSES BONENFAUNT OF LONDON, SON OF AARON OF HEREFORD. William de Solle William, son of John de la Mere of Staunton William, son of Geoffrey de Hat fend Roger Pychard of Staunton Roger Ken of Mordif ord John de Wyk of Garway Walter Ouerse William Freman or Marden Old Chest. 20 marks 12 marks, | qr. of corn, and 2 geese 6 marks 12 marks 2 marks 5 marks 26 marks, 2 qrs. of corn 3 marks John Swemest Nich', son of Nich' Devereux ?20 40*. New Chest. Eichard de Crowenhull of Sutton, 40 qrs. of Walter de Frene, Stephen le corn Paumer of Sutton John, son of Walter de Balun, Henry of Hereford, knight, William de Baysham of Here? fordshire, clerk Hugh Godard, Stephen de Newton of Herefordshire Nich' le Archer, son and heir of Nich' le Archer of Tarrington Nich', son of Lord Nich' le Archer of Herefordshire Brian, son of Brontun' 40 qrs. of corn 12 qrs. of corn 10 sacks of wool at ?10 6 sacks of wool at ?10 24*., 1 cloak April 28, 1 Edward I. St. John's Eve, 1 Edward I. Eve of St. John the Baptist, 2 Edward I. Eve of St. John the Baptist, 2 Edward I. Mid Lent, 2 Edward I. Morrow of Palm Sunday, 2 Edward I. Morrow of Epiphany, 2 Ed? ward I. Morrow of Ascension Day, 2 Edward I. Eve of St. Guthlac, 2 Edward I. Eve of St. Francis, 4 Edward I Purification Day, 13 Edward I Monday before St. Nicholas, 14 Edward I. of Henry de Molers, knight, Lord 30 qr?. of of Dorstone in Herefordshire corn Nomen Christiani ignoratur1 (a. 10?. tally) Wiliam, clerk of Baysham 20 marks Philip, son of John Storel of Here- 60 qrs, fordshire, Richard, son of of corn Adam David of Steventon in Shropshire Friday, Eve of Finding Cross, 14 Edward I. Thursday after Nativity of Virgin, 14 Edward 1. Wednesday after Octaves of St. John Baptist, 14 Edward I. Sunday after St. Bartholomew, 14 Edward I. Friday after Translation of St. Thomas Martyr, 14 Edward I. Friday after Translation of St. Thomas Martyr, 14 Edward I. Sunday after Assumption of Virgin, 15 Edward I. Morrow of St. Andrew Apostle, 15 Edward I. 1 The name of the creditor in this case is given as Fauntynus, which is pro? bably a way of describing Bonenfaunt, who on page 159 appears as Fauntekyn.</page><page sequence="16">of the jews of hereford in 1290. 151 Hugh Godard (a tally) Henry de Hereford, knight 43s. id. Quinzaine of St. John Baptist, 17 Edward I. 40 marks Tuesday, St. Benedict's Day, 18 Edward I. Belia, Daughter of Aaron. Old Chest. Robert, son of Nich' de Furches 24s. Tuesday before St. Valentine, 43 Henry III. John Lannare of Sutton 9 marks The day on which "Rejoice Jerusalem" is sung, 2 Edward I. Bonamy, Son of Aaron. New Chest. Henry of Gloucester, living at 100s. Monday, Eve of St. Luke, 17 How Caple Edward I. Josse, Son of Aaron of Caerleon. Old Chest. Ralph de Frene of Cowarne 4 marks Eve of St. Peter, 3 Edward I. Elias, Son of Aaron. Old Chest. 12\ marks Eve of Lent, 55 Henry III. 30s. SS. Peter and Paul, 1 Edward I. 10 marks Eve of Assumption of Virgin, 1 Edward I. 40s., 3 Morrow of St. Nicholas, 2 "truges" Edward I. of corn John of Northwis' Walter le Blake of Mainestune 1 Roger de Calewehull of Dorstone William Mantage of Straddel Sarah of Hereford, Daughter of Elias of Gloucester. Old Chest. 4 marks Peter the Vicar of Aylton Mael of Caple William de Huntes Robert de Walssenede Hugh, son of Alan of Staunton William de Rokeleye the Smith Walter Canne of Fawley 9 marks 100s. 2 marks 4 marks 4 marks New Chest. 10 qrs. of Eve of St. Valentine, 1 Edward I. Whitweek, 2 Edward I. Sunday after Trinity Sunday, 2 Edward I. St. Dunstan's Day, 3 Edward I. Morrow of St. John Baptist, 3 Edward I. Morrow of Michaelmas, 4 Edward I. Friday before Annunciation, 14 Edward I. 1 See footnote 1, on p. 147 above.</page><page sequence="17">152 the debts and houses Henne, Daughter of Elias, Bishop of the Jews. Robert le Saler of Byscopestrete 2 marks Christmas Eve, 51 Henry Hugh, son of William de Bliss III. 5 marks All Saints' Eve, 51 Henry III. Bona, Daughter of Elias. Old Chest. Richard de Hurtesle juvenis 11 marks, Whitweek, 56 Henry III. 8*. Sd. Mael of Caple 100*. Eve of St. Thomas, 1 Edward I. John le Tighel of Wormelow, 20*. Eve of St. Edmund King, 2 Margery of Wormelow Edward I. John le Macun of Dewsall, 2 marks St. John's Day, 2 Edward I. Margery daughter of Stephen Of Dewsall Benedict, Son of Elias. Old Chest. 2 marks Eve of St. Thomas Apostle, 54 Henry III. 5| marks Morrow of All Souls, 56 Henry III. 30*. Walter Chapel, Robert Semen John Lannare of Staunton Adam, son of William Derne of Woodyatt Reginald de Furno of Evesbach, Adam Derne William of Pencombe Mill William of Pencombe Mill William de Aventre of Staunton Thomas, son of William de Bo lyngehop', living at K?peck 24*. 40*. 5 marks 4 marks 4 marks April 38 {sic), 1 Edward I. Whitweek. 1 Edward I. St. Barnabas Apostle's Day, 3 Edward I. Morrow of SS. Peter and Paul, 3 Edward I. Morrow of St. John Baptist, 3 Edward I. The morrow of the As? sumption of the Virgin, 3 Edward I. Elias, Son of Benedict. Old Chest. Richard of Bromfield 2J marks Trinity Sunday, 2 Edward I. William, son of Odo, Richard de la 4 marks St. Kenelm's Day, 2 Edward I. Mere, tailor Cuntessa, Daughter of Benedict Old Chest. Thomas, son of William de Bo- 5 marks St. Kenelm's Day, 2 Edward I. lyngehop of Kilpeck Hagin, Son of Elias. Old Chest. Hugh, son of William de Bliss 5 marks Eve of All Saints, 51 Henry III.</page><page sequence="18">of the jews of hereford in 1290. 153 William de la Pirie of Sutton Richard G-ernun of Sutton David de H?ckel, Robert, son of Ralph of Norton David of Eckle Richard G-ernun of Sutton, John Rigge of Sutton David of Eckle 40s., 3 " truges" of corn 40s., 2 "truges'' of corn 40s., 2 &lt;; truges" of corn 20s. 3 marks 4 marks, 6? Richard, son of Philip of Broomfield 4 marks John and Richard G-ernun of 40s. Sutton William Bade of Hinton in Peter- 4 marks church Robert of Weston Morrow of St. Gregory, 56 Henry III. Octaves of the Annunciation, 56 Henry III. Whit week, 57 Henry III. St. Matthias' Day, 1 Edward I. Thursday after Easter, 1 Edward I. St. Thomas' Day, 1 Edward I. All Saints' Eve, 2 Edward I. Morrow of All Souls, 2 Ed? ward I. Easter Week, 3 Edward I. Robert, son of Ralph of Norton ?10, 1 cart- Morrow of St. Bartholomew, load 3 Edward I. of hay 5 marks, 1 Morrow of the Assumption of qr. of corn the Virgin, 3 Edward I. Josse, Son of Elias le Blund of London. Old Chest. Alfred del Br?k of Bromyard ?4 All Souls' Day, 47 Henry III. 100s. Eve of Michaelmas, 3 Edward I. Robert of Stottesdon Josse, Son of Maunser or Maunsellus. Old Chest. Robert of Norton, David of Eckle 40s. Richard of Broomfield Robert Pedayn of Snodehull Adam Botyller Pauncefot Adam Botyller Pauncefot Stephen Cocus of Much Marcle William de Hatfend of Ledbury 4 marks 2 marks 60s. 6 marks New Chest. Friday after Easter, 1 Edward I. Monday after Nativity of the Virgin, 2 Edward I. Monday after Octaves of Trinity Sunday, 2 Edward I. Eve of Palm Sunday, 3 Edward I. Eve of St. Margaret, 3 Edward I. 10 qrs. of Tuesday, St. Barnabas' Day, 14 corn Edward I. 12 qrs. of Wednesday after Nativity of corn the Virgin, 14 Edward I.</page><page sequence="19">154 the debts and houses Hugh Glodard, Hugh Hakelutel of 30 qrs. of Eaton corn William de Hatf end of Ledbury 30 qrs. of corn Robert Buter, son and heir of 40??. William Buter Roger de Hereford, son and heir of 6 marks Richard de Hereford, formerly clerk of the Exchequer Robert Buter 10 marks Robert Buter 11 marks Miles Pichard, son and heir of ?4 Roger Pichard of Staunton Robert Boter, son and heir of 10 marks William Boter Ralph, son of Lord Adam de 100*. Elmerugge, John Warde Hugh de Patynton 40*. Roger, son of Roger de Lugone 1 2 marks Hugh de Patynton 100*. Roger de Butter ley, knight 16 marks Robert Boter, son and heir of 8 marks William Boter Robert Boter, son and heir of 8 marks William Boter Walter Hakelutel, son and heir of 12 (sir) Lord Walter Hakelutel Friday, Eve of SS. Peter and Paul, 14 Edward I. Friday after Epiphany, 15 Edward I. Morrow of St. Laurence, 16 Edward I. Sunday, St. Peter ad Vincula, 16 Edward I. Wednesday after the As? sumption of the Virgin, 17 Edward I. Wednesday before St. John Baptist's Day, 17 Edward I. 17 Edward I. Sunday after St. Hilary, 17 Edward I. Thursday before Christmas, 17 Edward I. Tuesday before St. G-uthlac, 18 Edward I. Tuesday after SS. Tyburcius and Vatianus, 18 Edward I. Monday after St. Katherine, 18 Edward I. Monday after St. Valentine, 18 Edward I. Saturday after St. Milburg, 18 Edward I. Tuesday after St. Edmund, 18 Edward I. Monday, Morrow of Trinity Sunday, 18 Edward I. Maunsellus, Son of Josse of Worcester. Old Chest. Aukin de Hulhamton 40*. William Morel of Dorstone, 10 marks William son of Hugh of Dor stone, John of Crasswall. John de Mewes 12 marks Morrow of the Finding of St. Stephen, 3 Edward I. St. Denis' Day, 4 Edward I. St. Francis' Day, 4 Edward I. Philip of Ocle Cok, Son of Maunsellus. Old Chest. 1 mark Morrow of the Assumption of the Virgin, 3 Edward I. 1 Perhaps " of Lugwardine."</page><page sequence="20">of the jews of hereford in 1290. John Byket of Hereford 40s. 155 Eve of St. John Baptist, 4 Edward I. Isaac of Worcester. Old Chest. Robert Blundel, knight, of Shrop- 40s. Monday before St. Laurence, shire 46 Henry III. Elyas, Son of Isaac. Old Chest. William, son of Philip de 1 silver Eve of St. Martin, 2 Edward I. Wordebyr' Robert, son of Robert de Weston Thomas Paris of Peaune Adam of Broomfield Adam of Broomfield Adam of Broomfield mark 10 marks Michaelmas, 2 Edward I. 20s.- Morrow of All Saints, 2 Edward I. 8 marks Eve of St. Edmund King, 3 Edward I. 4 marks Eve of St. Margaret, 3 Edward I. 3 marks Easter week, 3 Edward I. Aaron, Son of Isaac of Worcester. Old Chest. William de Cancell, William 100s. Paulyn William, son of William de Waseburne William Clericus of Lincestr' Robert, son of Thomas of Hinton in Gloucestershire Alexander le Marescall of Lincestr' 48s. 30s. 100s. 8 marks Eve of St. Margaret, 3 Edward I. St. Denis' Day, 3 Edward I. Morrow of Michaelmas, 3 Edward I. Morrow of Holy Cross Day, 3 Edward I. St. Denis' Day, 4 Edward I. Nich' de Trillec Adam Phelipp of Great Gowarne, Robert de Hereford of Great Cowarne Roger, son of Gilbert Freman Robert Fraunceys of Eaton Henry, son of Ythel of Clehonger John de Sully of Newnham Roger of Burton Sampson, Son of Isaac of Worcester. Old Chest. 2 marks Monday after St. Ethelbert, 45 Henry III. 4 marks Morrow of St. James, 3 Edward I. 4 marks Morrow of Michaelmas, 3 Edward I. 16s. Eve of St. James, 3 Edward I. 1 mark Morrow of St. Giles, 3 Edward I. ?8 Morrow of St. Giles, 3 Edward I. 4 marks Morrow of Michaelmas, 3 Edward I. 100s. Morrow of S. Denis, 4 Edward I.</page><page sequence="21">156 the debts and houses Hoger le Lumyner of Kingston 40*. St Denis' Day, 4 Edward I. Moses, Son of Isaac. Old Chest. John Patrick of Peesch 40 {sic) Eve of Dedication of Hereford Church, 3 Edward I. Joye, Son of Isaac. Old Chest. Richard de Borleghe 5 marks Thursday before St. Edmund King and Martyr, 45 Henry III. Mirable, Daughter of Isaac. Old Chest. Roger de Calewehull of Dorstone 27\ marks, St. Kenelm's Day, 2 Edward 1 qr. of corn I. Moses, Son of Abraham. Old Chest. Walter de Newbury of Bromfield 40*. St. Mary Magdalene's Day, 3 Edward I. Symon (Juthiac of Woolhope 25*. Morrow of St. Bartholomew, 4 Edward I. Cuntessa, Daughter of Moses. Old Chest. Henry le Mound of Evesbach 20*. Tuesday after St. Barnabas, 55 Henry III. Robert Fraunceys of Eaton 20*., 1 "tr?ge" Morrow of St. Valentine, 1 of corn Edward I. Robert Fraunceys of Eaton 30*. Eve of St. Denis, 2 Edward I. Henry Coppe of Eaton, Robert 30*. St. Lucy's Day, 2 Edward I. Fraunceys of Eaton William, son of John le Brun of 5 marks Eve of the Annunciation 3 Tarrington Edward I. Ursellus, Son of Hagin of G-loucester. New Chest. John Wyberd, son and heir of Wil- 20 qrs. of Hokeday, 14 Edward I. liam Wyberd corn Hugh, son of Reginald Moniword 60 qrs. of St. Denis' Day, 14 Edward I. of Hereford corn Nich', son and heir of Nich' le 1 sack of Annunciation Day, 14 Ed Archer wool at 12 ward I. marks William de la Forde of Heytherley 20 qrs. of Friday before All Saints, 14 corn Edward I. Philip, son of Symon of Maddesdon 30*. St. John Baptist's Day, 14 Ed (A tally) ward I.</page><page sequence="22">of the jews of hereford in 1290. 157 Jacob, Son of Sadekyn of Hereford. Old Chest. John de la Legh of BurV parish 1 mark Eve of St. Matthew, 3 Ed ward I. Walter of Stretton, clerk 5 marks Wednesday before Michaelmas, 3 Edward I. John de la Heth' of Lastres parish 40s. Eve of St. John the Baptist, 4 Edward I. Hagin, Son of Jacob of G-loucester. Old Chest. Robert de Mucegros of Frome 2 marks Tuesday before St. Denis, 51 Henry III. Robert of Weston 6 marks Eve of St. Martin, 2 Edward I. Hagin, Son of Belia of G-loucester. New Chest. Stephen of Bodenham, clerk, Ni- 15 qrs. of Tuesday before St. Luke, 14 cholas of Ferne, tailor corn Edward I. G-ente, Daughter of Hagin. Old Chest. John de la Hope of Bastn? parish 40s. SS. Cosmus and Damianus, 3 Edward I. Hagin, Son of Hagin. Old Chest. Richard, son of Hugh de Kinardes- 8 marks Eve of St. Mary Magdalene, 3 ley Edward I. William lee Waleys, son of John le ?10 Michaelmas, 13 Edward I. Waleys of Great Brompton, living at St. Keyne Hagin de Weobley of Hereford. Neio Chest. Philip Storel, son and heir of John 32s. Michaelmas, 13 Edward I. Storel of Pembridge John of Swanston, Robert Beausire, 60 qrs. of Sunday after Gule of August, Robert Oversee, John Oversee corn 15 Edward I. Adam, son of John de Wilton, of 10 qrs. of Friday after St. Hilary, 15 Dymock parish corn Richard, son of John de Morton 4 marks Richard, son of John de Morton ?10 John Caldecote of Holm Lacy 60s. Walter, son of Philip le Marescall ?10 of Leominster Edward I. Friday before St. Bartholo? mew, 17 Edward I. Friday, Morrow of the Purifi? cation, 18 Edward I. Tuesday after SS. Nereus and Achilles, 18 Edward I. Tuesday after SS. Nereus and Achilles, 18 Edward I.</page><page sequence="23">158 the debts and houses Isaac, Son of Hagin de Weobley. New Chest. Thomas de Strongf ord of Pern- 60 qrs. of Morrow of St. John the Baptist, bridge corn 14 Edward I. William Pele of Codeleye 5 marks Monday after St. Luke, 17 Edward I. Isaac l'Evesque of London. New Chest. Peter de Grenham, knight, of 8 sacks of Shrewsbury, 15 July, 11 Ed Devonshire wool at J ward I. mark1 Benedict l'Evesque. New Chest. Richard le Crewenhull of Sutton, 30 qrs. of Leominster Fair, 13 Edward I. Stephen le Paumer of Sutton corn Roger, son and heir of Adam Tocey 30 qrs. of Sunday, St. Edmund's Day, of Lulham corn 18 Edward I. David, Son of Assel. New Chest. Roger, son of Adam Tocey of Lul- 30 qrs. of Monday, Morrow of St. James ham corn Apostle, 16 Edward I. Abraham, Chaplain of the Jews of Hereford. New Chest. William Owen of Ludlow 8 marks Tuesday after Exaltation of the Cross, 16 Edward I. Elias, Son of Jacob, Old Chest. Henry le Rons of Kilpeck 20??. Wednesday before Michaelmas, 3 Edward I. bonenfaunt, son of elias, and isaac, son of jose. New Chest. Thomas, Son of John de Upton ?60 Friday after St. Guthlac, 18 Edward I. Jose, Son of Maunser, and Benedict l'Evesque. New Chest. Philip de Wurml' son of Hugh de 30 qrs. of Friday after St. Petronilla, 18 Wurml' of Madley parish corn Edward I. 1 There must be some mistake here, as the price given is too low.</page><page sequence="24">of the jews of hereford in 1290. 159 THE HOUSES OF THE JEWS OF HEREFORD THAT BECAME THE KING'S PROPERTY IN 1290. Tenement with, buildings belonging to Aaron of Hereford, and inhabited by him, of a yearly value of 20*., charged with a yearly payment of 2*. to the Ferm of Hereford, and therefore of the clear yearly value to the king of . 18*. Tenement belonging to Aaron of Hereford, which he bought of John Whitney, of a yearly value of 3*., charged with a yearly payment to the Ferm of Hereford of 2*., and therefore of the clear yearly value to the king of . 1*. The Synagogue of the Jews, with a shop, in bad repair, adjacent, of a yearly value of 4*., charged with a payment to the Ferm of Hereford of 1*., and therefore of the clear yearly value to the king of . ... ... 3*. Two shops belonging to Fauntekyn, son of Aaron, of the yearly value of 4*., charged with yearly payments to the Ferm of Hereford of 1*., and to the Prior of St. G-uthlac's, Hereford, of 1*., and there? fore of a clear yearly value to the king of . 2*. A tenement in a lane, consisting of two shops, with a story built above, of the yearly value of. ... . 4*. Messuage, with building and one shop adjacent, of the yearly value of 12*., and charged with annual payments to the Ferm of Here? ford of 1*. 6d., and to John the Goldsmith of 2d., and therefore of the year clearly value to the king of . 10*. id. A house belonging to Hagin de Weobley, of the yearly value of 6*., and of the clear yearly value to the king of ... . 5*. House with two shops belonging to Cok of Hereford, of the yearly value of 15*. Sd., charged with an annual payment to the chief lords of the fee of 10*. 8d., and therefore of the clear yearly value to the king of ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 5*. House belonging to Elias de Ardre, next to that of Reginald Moni? word, of the yearly value of 4*., charged with a yearly payment to the lord of the fee of 2*., and therefore of the clear yearly value to the king of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2*. Clear yearly value to the king of the houses mentioned ab3ve .. 51sAd.(sic') House in bad repair, belong to Elias de Ardre, pledged to him for 30*. (doubtful) . 2*. House belonging to Fauntekyn, son of Aaron, which he held for a term of four years, paying in full beforehand (doubtful) .. 2*. Total . . 55*. 6d. (*?/??)</page></plain_text>