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Condition of the Jews of England at the time of their Expulsion in 1290

B. Lionel Abrahams

<plain_text><page sequence="1">THE CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND AT THE TIME OF THEIR EXPULSION IN 1290. By B. LIONEL ABRAHAMS. I cannot pretend that the remarks with which I intend to trouble you this evening will be very instructive or at all interesting. I wish to do two things : first, to direct your thoughts to the considera? tion of the nature, the extent, and the defects, of the information that is obtainable concerning the condition of the Jews of mediseval England ; and, secondly, to put before you certain information on the subject, which is not particularly interesting in itself, but which has the merit, such as it is, of having never before been published, and of being, as I shall show you, our only important source of knowledge concerning the Jewish communities of which the members were expelled from England in 1290. We are accustomed, and, no doubt, rightly, to regard the Middle Ages as the great religious ages of European history. The period from the eleventh to the fourteenth centuries is certainly the greatest and most impressive in the history of the Catholic Church. Within that period the political and religious power of the Church rose to the highest point that it ever reached, and there were created all the most magnifi? cent expressions of Cbristian religious feeling, in literature, in art, and in institutions. The Judaism of that period, the Judaism which, scattered throughout Catholic Europe, refused stedfastly to allow itself to be influenced in any degree by Catholicism, or to regard its funda? mental beliefs as anything but superstition, and which retained undimi nished and unaltered its own beliefs and hopes and superstitions, must</page><page sequence="2">CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. 77 have been a religion exercising a power over the minds of men which we in these days of easy-going religion can scarcely understand, and the age during which it endured must have been one of the greatest episodes in the career of the Jewish race. We naturally ask what manner of men the Jews of this age were ; what kind of life they lived ; by what means they preserved throughout the proselytising and persecuting Middle Ages the purity of their race and the integrity of their beliefs ? To some of these questions we have an answer, to others I believe that at present we have none. Of course, there is no lack of illustration of the great vital fact of mediaeval Jewish history?the fact that the Judaism of the Middle Ages was to its adherents a religion to die for. Indeed, the abundant records of persecution and martyrdom, by which it is proved, are the most important of all the documents concerning mediaeval Jewish history that have come down to us. We know also fairly well what was the nature of the religion which inspired the Jewish martyrs of the Middle Ages with the courage to die in its defence. The history of theological doc? trines, of Biblical interpretation, and of the growth of ceremonial and ritual, can all be traced in the remains of mediaeval Jewish literature. The political relations, also, between the Jews and their masters can be discovered from the study of the decrees of the Church and of tem? poral rulers. But all these things do not enable us to realise in imagi? nation the every-day life of the Jews of the Middle Ages. For that, we need something more. We need to be told about the details of life inside the G-hetto, about the organisation of the Jewish com? munities, the occupations of their members, the classes into which they were divided, the relations between classes within the communities and between the communities and their non-Jewish neighbours. One would have to be a Hebrew scholar to say whether information of this kind is likely ever to be laid before the world. Certainly that account of Jewish history, which is the latest and is said to be the best, that by Graetz, furnishes it most scantily. It tells us of the persecutions that the Jews suffered and of the books that they wrote. But the Jews were not always being persecuted or writing books or reading them. Perhaps a new historian may one day arise to give us some idea of what were the daily lives and thoughts of those inhabitants of mediaeval Ghettos, to whose endurance and tenacity is due the main</page><page sequence="3">78 CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. tenance of Judaism to the present day, and of whose histories we are at once so proud and so ignorant.1 Meanwhile as we, who are here this evening, are particularly interested in the Jews of England, and as I happen to be in possession of certain official information concerning them, I have put together in a form in which it can be very briefly presented to you the little that is known concerning the generation of them which was expelled from this country. You will see, by the time I have finished, how little I am able to add to your knowledge of Anglo-Jewish History, but you will, I hope, agree with me that any addition at all to our scanty knowledge of the earlier period of that history is worth making. I may assume, I suppose, that the general outlines of the history of the mediaeval Jews of England is well known, and that you are familiar with the facts that the first Jews came to England shortly after the Norman Conquest ; that they were protected by the kings of England, and were indeed wholly dependent on them; that at first all of them, and always a certain proportion of them, lived as money-lenders; that large numbers of them were massacred periodically, as for example by the Crusaders, by the members of the Baronial party in the Barons' Wars, and by various other less distinguished assailants ; that their pursuit of the occupation of money-lending began in 1269 to be inter? fered with by legislation, and was for a time altogether prohibited in 1275 ; and that in 1290 they were expelled from England. All this happened within the space of about two centuries. As you are of course aware, everything, or almost everything, that is knowable concerning the first of these two centuries is collected in Mr. Joseph Jacobs's book called The Jews of Angevin England. That book contains a large number of documents that illustrate the business transactions of the Jews, and their relations with the king, with his treasury, and with his officers of various kinds, and a few passages from contemporary historians which illustrate the social relations between Jews and Christians : it also contains accounts of martyrdoms and massacres, and information about the very scanty works of Anglo Jewish literature. Concerning the legal position in which the Jew 1 This paper was written before the appearance of Mr. Israel Abrahams' epoch-making work on "Jewish Life in the Middle Ages." There is com? paratively little in that book concerning English Jews.</page><page sequence="4">CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. 79 found himself when dealing with the constituted authority of the land, or with his debtors, we cannot reasonably desire more information than we have, and we are able to calculate with fair confidence the amount of the fines, amercements and tallages that the King derived each year from the Jews in return for the protection that he extended to them. But what the Jews were at home we do not know. In the whole of Mr. Jacobs's collection you will, I think, find very few passages of personal individual interest, which enable you to realise what a mediaeval English Jew was in the moments when he was not lending money, making payments to the king's exchequer, or being plundered and massacred. Now the information concerning the last generation of the English Jews before the Expulsion, is confined, though more closely, within the same limits as that concerning the period with which Mr. Jacobs's book deals. Personal interest is absolutely wanting. Of the religious feeling of that generation, we have absolutely no expression. Their chief literary products were a treatise on the subject of synagogue ritual, and a handbook of grammar. Beyond these works, not a single one of their utterances remains on record. The information which we have is, like a great part of the information for the earlier period with which Mr. Jacobs's book deals, very largely statistical in its nature, and derived from official sources. The chief facts can be laid before you in five minutes. We know, to begin with, the number of the Jews who were expelled from England. It was 16,000. We have a fairly complete list of the towns in which they had been residing before the Expulsion. They were seventeen in number, an? included most of the important towns in England. The number of towns had at one time been larger than it was at the time of the Expulsion. But from some the Jews had been driven out in consequence of the animosity of the inhabitants (for this reason the Jews of Bury St. Edmunds and Leicester, among others, had been compelled to move elsewhere); from other towns, such as Windsor and Winchelsea, they had been sent away by order of the King, who wished that no Jews should live anywhere except in a place where there was a staff of officers to supervise them ; from other towns the King had deported them at the request of his mother, who disliked Jews, and induced her son to free from their presence all the towns of her domain, [for this last reason the Jews of Marlborough were</page><page sequence="5">80 CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. compelled, a few years before the Expulsion, to move to Devizes, those of Gloucester to Bristol, those of Worcester to Hereford, and those of Cambridge to Huntingdon]. Thus, in the few years before the Ex? pulsion, all the Jews of England lived in seventeen towns, and in them they carried on business partly as wholesale dealers in corn and wool, the two chief articles of English merchandise of the time, and partly as money-lenders. The lending of money on interest was not forbidden during the last ten years before the Jews were expelled from England, though it had been for a few years since 1275. But all efforts to prevent it had been made in vain, as the Jews seem to have persistently defied the law at the time of prohibition, and to have found some means of lending money and of getting interest on it; and thus the prohibition was removed, and the practice was allowed under certain restrictions. The restrictions were severe enough to make the greater part of the Jews with money take to the other two occupations that I have just mentioned, the trade in corn and the trade in wool. The Jews were wholesale traders ; but the way in which they carried on their trade is not quite clear. They seem to have made agreements with producers that there should be supplied to them so many quarters of corn, or so many sacks of wool, at a fixed price at some future time, and they deposited the price with the producer, receiving a bond in acknowledgment. But from the extant bonds, it does not appear how this future time was chosen. Sometimes the bond was allowed to run on for years, and the produce was not even then delivered. We may reasonably conjecture that during all this time the Jews received interest on the money that they had deposited, and, therefore, that some of the so-called Jewish wool and corn merchants of the thirteenth century were really money-lenders in disguise. Whether the Jewish trade in produce was genuine or not, considerably more than half the capital of the Jews was ostensibly interested in it. This fact we know because the lists of all the bonds and obligations on account of money and produce owing, at the time of the Expulsion, to the Jews of eleven of the seventeen towns of England in which Jews resided, are still extant.* The total value on record is about ?9,100, made up as follows : Money, about ?4,000 ; corn, about ?2,700; and wool, about ?2,400. This total represents all the trading capital of the Jews of the towns to which the lists refer, for, * See Appendix,</page><page sequence="6">CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. 81 seeing that tbe Jews had to leave the shores of England within three months after the publication of the decree of expulsion, they cannot in times of slow payment and slow travelling have recalled any but the most trifling proportion of their capital in time to take it away with them. The small amount of the capital belonging to a community of traders numbering 16,000 persons, scarcely any of whom possessed any landed property of any kind, except the houses in which they lived, is very remarkable, even when we remember that the lists of bonds of the Jews of London, York, Stamford, Ipswich, Colchester and Bedford are lost. Of course, we can only conjecture what was the amount of property belonging to the Jews of these six towns. Probably we shall be making a very liberal estimate if we put it down at ?6,000, and this would bring the trading capital of the Jews of England at the time of their expulsion to about ?15,000. These figures, especially when compared with what we know of the wealth of the Jewry and the revenue derived from it in the twelfth and the earlier part of the thirteenth centuries, show to how great an extent the Jews had been impoverished by the persecutions that they had suffered in the baronial wars, bj the extortions that had been practised by John and Henry III., and by the anti-usury legislation of Edward I. A comparison of the figures that we possess for the period before the Barons' wars with those for the period after the Barons' wars will show clearly how remarkable a change for the worse had taken place in the circum? stances of the Jews. In the twelfth century the Jews of England, num? bering, according to Mr. Joseph Jacobs's estimate, about 2,000 persons1, had yielded to the Exchequer a steady revenue of ?3,000 a year, which had risen considerably in the early part of the thirteenth century. At the time of the Expulsion the number of Jews in England was many times as great as in the twelfth century; yet we might feel sure, even if no records on the subject were at our service, that out of the profits of a trading capital of ?15,000 it was impossible for ?3,000 a year to be paid to the Treasury. We have, however, extant Exchequer records2 1 I am inclined to doubt the correctness of this estimate. It seems unlikely that the numbers of a community should increase from 2,000 to 16,000 in less than two centuries, especially in a period of ill-treatment and occasional massacre. 2 PubKc Record Office : Q.B, Exchequer of Receipts?Jews, 5-18 Edward I, TOL. II. Gr</page><page sequence="7">82 CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. which show the exact amount of revenue which Edward I. was able to squeeze out of the Jews during his reign. It was less than ?700 a year. And, if we omit from the calculation the accounts for the two years before the passing of the most severe legislation against usury in 1275, the average yearly revenue yielded by the Jews for the rest of the reign comes to a good deal less than ?700. Obviously, a trading community, the members of which possessed on an average a capital of ?1 a head, and which yielded altogether to the treasury of its absolute lord and master less than Is. a head each year, must have been, even in days when money was of thirty times its present value, in a state of very moderate prosperity. But even this small capital was very unequally distributed. The ?9,100 that was held by the Jews of eleven of the seventeen Jewish towns of England was in the hands of about 260 persons, and two-thirds of it was held by 82 persons belong? ing to 18 families. In nearly every one of the English Ghettos we are able, with the help supplied by our lists of bonds, to trace the existence of a little plutocracy clearly separated from the rest of the trading and money-lending classes. Thus, in Hereford, there were 41 Jewish creditors, but nearly two-thirds of all the money owing to them was owing to two persons, father and son, and a large number of the relations of these two were creditors for smaller amounts. In Norwich, again, one family held two-thirds of all the property belonging to the Jews of the city, and similarly in Oxford, one family held more than half of all the property belonging to Jews. It is clear that the Jews who were expelled from England consisted of three classes ; one a small class of comparatively well-to-do money? lenders and traders forming the chief families of each local congrega? tion ; the second class, somewhat larger, but still forming a minority, of money-lenders and traders of moderate means, who carried on the same kind of business as the members of the richer families, but on a much smaller scale ; and, thirdly, a large majority composed of persons who did not lend money, and of whom we can say with confidence that it was because they did not have it to lend. You may perhaps think that in deducing this conclusion from the information furnished by the official register of the Jewish bonds I am speaking more confidently than I should, and that from a mere list of certain Jews who had money owing to them we cannot discover into</page><page sequence="8">CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. 83 what classes the communities were divided whether nor the poor class was a large one. But the lists are thoroughly to be depended on as complete records of Jewish transactions for the towns to which they refer, seeing that no business transaction, involving the use of credit, in which a Jew was concerned, was valid unless an agreement was entered into by means of a bond, such as would certainly be entered in the lists as we have them. Book credit was, of course, unknown in the Middle Ages ; bonds took its place, and the possession of a list of the bonds belonging to a community of mediaeval traders gives us the same information concerning it as we should have concerning a modern community if we possessed all the accounts of all the houses of business to which any of its members belonged ; and thus the fact that the names of Jewish creditors on our lists are so few, shows that Jewish capitalists, even small capitalists, made up only a small minority of the members of the Jewish community in England in 1290. Moreover, the same fact is proved by another piece of quite independent evidence. You are, perhaps, aware that the House for Jewish Converts in London, the institution concerning which Mr. Trice Martin discoursed to this Society last year, derived a portion of its income from a poll tax of 3d. a head payable by all the Jews, and presumably the Jewesses, of England. The accounts for several years of the House for Converts are preserved, arid they show that the number of persons who paid poll tax in 1280 was 1,179 ; in the next year, 1,153 ; in the next 1,133 ; in the next 1,151 ; and for subsequent years the number seems to have been even lower. Now we may take it for granted that the tax was collected from everyone whose means enabled him to pay it; and the fact that only about 1,200 Jews out of 16,000 could pay a tax, which would be equal at the present time to about 7s. 6d. a year, is fresh proof that the great majority of the Jews of England were in the thirteenth century, as they are in the nineteenth century, very poor indeed. Of the rich class which formed a minority of the Jews of England we know a little ; and what we know I have put before you this evening. But of the poor who made up the great majority we know nothing. They are absolute strangers to us. Towards the poor Englishmen of those times we have a certain fellow-feeling. We meet them in Chaucer ; we hear in Piers the Ploivman their complaints G 2</page><page sequence="9">84 CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. of the sorrow and injustice that are in the world in which they live. But it is not so with the Jews in England of the poorer classes in the Middle Ages. We do not even know how they managed to gain a livelihood. The existence of the Guilds prevented them from following any trade or handicraft in towns, and it is doubtful whether they were ever allowed tc live anywhere except in the towns. Some of them were no doubt servants in the houses of the rich, some, as we know, were pawnbrokers, some, though this is unlikely, may have belonged to the humblest class of day-labourers ; but how the great majority con? trived to maintain themselves we have absolutely no means of discovering. Our sources of information are exhausted, and, when we go beyond the question of how the living was made, then we are equally ignorant with regard to the rich and the poor. As soon as we ask for more than the mere details that are afforded by the records of business and legal transactions, such as I have dealt with this evening, we find that our authorities are dumb. If there had been one among the English Jews of the latter half of the thirteenth century who was able to set forth in literary form any incidents of his own life or of the lives of his brethren, we might have been able to form an idea of howT their sufferings, and the faith that enabled them to endure them, affected their daily action and speech. But there was none such. The literary power which enables a member of one generation to transmit to gene? rations to come the living image of his contemporaries is not a Jewish gift, and, in consequence, though the cruel sufferings of the Jews who were expelled from England lend to Anglo-Jewish History the most dramatic of the few dramatic episodes that it possesses, yet the sufferers are to us mere shadows, and not even the most patriotic or the most imaginative of the Jews of to-day can enter for a moment into their thoughts or their feelings.</page><page sequence="10">85 APPENDIX. The Lists which follow have been compiled from the following1 manuscripts :? I.?IN THE PUBLIC RECORD OFFICE. Exchequer; Queen's Remembrancer's Miscellanea : ? Jews, 557-9.* List of houses held in 1290 on fee or for a term of years by the Jews of the following- towns or counties :?Bedford, Bristol, Cambridge, Canterbury, Colchester, Exeter, Hereford, Ipswich, Lincoln, Northampton, Norwich, Nottingham, Oxford, Stamford, Wiltshire, Winchester, York. ? 557-10 Lint of the chests of deeds brought to the Exchequer at Westminster by the Sheriffs of the following towns or counties :?London, Cambridge, Huntingdon, Northamp? ton, Kent, Wiltshire, Devonshire, Southampton, Norfolk, Suffolk, Nottingham, Hereford, Oxford, Lincoln, Essex, Gloucester, Bedford, York, Worcester, Warwick. 557-n. List of houses similar to 557-9 above. 557-13. List of bonds belonging to Jews of Exeter. 557-14. ,, ? ? Cambridge. 557-15. ? ? ? Bristol. 557-ie. ? 5? ?&gt; Hereford. 557-17. ? ? ? Canterbury. 557-18. ? ? ?? Lincoln. *The following writ is included in Q.R. 557-9 Edwardus, dei gratia, Rex Angliae, dominus Hiberniae, et dux Aquitaniae, viceeomiti Eboracensi salutem. Praeeipimus tibi quod areham Cyrographariorum Judaeorum Eboraci sub salvo et securo conductu cariari facias usque West monasterium, ita quod earn habeas ibidem in quindena S. Martini Thesaurario et Baronibus de scaecario nostro liberandam, ad faciendum inde quod per eosdem duximus ordinandum : et scire facias Cyrographariis Christianis archae praedictae quod time sint ibi cum eadem archa, deferentes secum omnes obligationes et instrumenta quae snnt in custodia sua extra arcliam praedictam sub nominibus quorumcunque Christianorum et Judaeorum confecta : et tu ipse in propria persona tua interim diligenter inquiras quas domos et quae tenementa Judaei Eboracenses quos nuper simul aliis Judaeis Angliae regnum nostrum exire praecepimus babuerunt in balliva tua tarn in feodo quam ad terminum, et quantum tenementa ilia quae tennerunt in feodo valeant per annum in omnibus exitibus suis, salvis servieiis capitalium dominorum, et quae servicia inde debentur eisdem dominis et quantum tenementa quae tenuerunt ad terminum valeant per annum ultra praestationem annuam quam solverunt pro eisdem, et si judei praedicti pro tenemeutis sic ad terminum receptis solverunt premanibus vel de anno in annum, et quantum restat adhuc venturum de terminis antedictis : Et omnes domos et tenementa praedicta in manum nostran" capi facias, et ea ad locandum dimittas, prout ad commodum nostrum melius fuerit faciendum : et tune scire facias eisdem Baronibus quas terras et quae tonementa ceperis in manum nostram occasione praedicta, et valorem eorundem et qualiter ea dimiseris : et interim per totam ballivam nostram (qu. tuam ?) pupplice proclamari facias quod omnes illi qui in eadem balliva tua aliquid habent de bonis et catallis praedictorum judeorum sine nomine depositi (sic) sive quocimque alio modo, illud habeant ibidem ad diem praedictum praefatis Thesaurario et Baronibus ad opus nostrum liberandum sub poena vitae et membrorum necnon amissionis omnium quae tenent in regno nostro si super concelamento huiusmodi bonorum eos in posterum couvinci contingit: Et habeas ibi tecum hoc breve. Teste Magistro W. de llarchia, Thesaurario nostro, apud West monasterium iiij die Octobris, anno regni nostri xviij?.</page><page sequence="11">86 CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. Jews, 557-19. List of bonds belonging to Jews of Norwich. ? 557-20. 5, ? ? Nottingham. 55 557-21. ? ? ? Oxford. 5, 557-22. ? ? ,? Southampton. ? 557-23- ? j? ?, Wiltshire. II.?IN THE BRITISH MUSEUM. Lansdowne Manuscripts, vol. 826, part 5, transcript 4. Copy of the grants made in 1291, to 85 recipients, of houses formerly held by Jews, which had fallen into the King's hands at the Expulsion. The lists below contain the names of all owners of bonds, houses, and lands mentioned in any of the manuscripts. A summary of all the information concerning bonds for money, corn or wool, which is contained in the second and in the last eleven of the Public Record Office Manuscripts (Q.R. 557-i0 and 557-13-23) is given by the side of the name of the person to whom each entry refers. The information concerning houses and lands, which is derived from Q.R. 557-9 and 557-h, and from the Lansdowne Transcript in the British Museum, is given in the form of footnotes to the names of the persons referred to in each entry. BEDFORD. 1. Cok, son of Benedict . 2. Pictavus ., The list of the bonds of the Jews of Bedford is lost. The archa was duly delivered at the Exchequer at Westminster, as recorded in Q.R. 557-i0:?Johannes de Pabeham vicecomes, Johannes Brodewe umis eyro graphariorum archae cyrographaruni judeorum de novis debitis Bedefordie venerunt et protulerunt unam archa m de novis debitis sigillatam sub sigillis praedicti vicecomitis [qu. et ?] Johannis Culebere Burgensis Bede? fordie. Et praedictus Johannes protulit unam pixidem cum duabus cartis sigillatam sub sigillis praedictorum vicecomitis et Johannis: et prae&lt;?cta pixis et una clavis dictae archae ponuntur in predicta Puchetta inter alias claves. Et Robertus de Stivington alter Cyro grapharius est mortuus. Othir Property. 1 Had the third part of one messuage in the High Street, of the yearly value of 6s. (Q.R. 557-9 and u, and Lansdowne.) 2 Had two messuages in the High Street, of the yearly value of 13s. 4d., for which he paid to the king, in the ferm of Bedford, 12^. a year, and to the Prior of Newenham 2s. 3|t2. a year. At the time of the expulsion, Pictavus had long since died. He had left two sons, Jacob and Benedict, who for a time remained in joint possession of the two messuages without distinguishing the share that belonged to each. Benedict was compelled to undergo baptism in the Isle of Ely, and for more than twelve years Jacob held the two messuages. Then Jacob was hanged for felony, and the messuages escheated to the king, who granted one of them to the Prior of Newnham. (Q.R. 557-3 and n, and Lansdowne.)</page><page sequence="12">CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. 87 1. Josce of Caerleon. 2. Aaron, son of Josce of Caerleon 3. Isaac, son of Josce of Caerleon.. 4. Hak of Caerleon and Cok de Strygyl., 5. Cok de Strygyl. 6. Cok de Strygyl and Sara, widow 7. Salomon, son of Hagyn 8. Sarah, daughter of Bennyt 9. Sarah . 10. Jacob, son of Jacob 11. Sampson de Wynton 12. Cok of Chepstow .. . 13. Isaac. 14. Benedict of Winchester, who was hanged 15. Hake le Pretre, who was hanged 16. Moses de Kent, hanged outside Bristol Castle. 17. Cressauut, who was hanged BRISTOL. BONDS. Corn. Ali from Q.R. 557-,6. ?27 7 8 20 qrs.= ?6 13 4 20 qrs.= 6 13 4 10qrs.= 3 6 8 60qrs.= 20 0 0 12qrs.= 4 0 0 18bshl.= 0 9 0 10qrs.= 4 0 0 Other Property. 1 Had a tenement in the street by the Castle, of the annual value of 6s. 8d., for which he paid to the King 4(kZ. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n.) 3 Had a tenement in Winch Street of the yearly value of 20s. 9?&lt;3., for which he paid to the King 6d, a year, and to the land tax 3?&lt;2. a year, and formerly had another tenement in Winchester of the yearly value of 6.$. which he gave to Cress, his son, and which Cress sold to William Macledon. (Q.R. 557-9 and u.) 14 Had a hou -e in Winch Street worth 10s. a year, which, if repaired, would be worth 13s. id. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and 15 Had two plots of land of the yearly value of 25s.. on which buildings were, in accordance with the King's writ, erected by Peter de la Mar, Constable of the town, and for which he paid to the King, on account of a certain charge called Langavel, 3f&lt;2. a year. (Q.R, 557-9 and n.) 16 Had a house and vacant piece of land of the annual value of 8s. (they would, however, be worth more if put in proper condition), for which he paid to John de Leygrave 40$. a year (Q.R 557-a and n.) 17 Had a small piece of land of the yearly value of 6d. (Q.R. 557-B and u.)</page><page sequence="13">88 CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. CAMBRIDGE AND HUNTINGDON. BONDS. Money. Corn. Wool. All from Q.R. 557-M. 1. Josce, son of Saulot 2. Aaron, son of Vives 3. Moses, son of Deulecress .. 4. Joceus, son of Deulesaut .. 5. Manser, of Huntingdon .. 6. Seleme, son of Bonenfaunt 7. Sampson, son of Isaac ?22 0 0 84 13 4 2 0 0 10 0 0 ?188 0 0 30qrs.= ?10 0 0 I qr. = 0 3 4 ?10 3 4 1 sack = ?6 13 4 10 sacks= 80 0 0 ?86 13 4 Other Property. 1 Had a messuage of the yearly value of 20s., for which he paid to the Prior of Bernewett 6s. 8d. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) CANTERBURY. BONDS. 1. Aaron, son of Cresse of Winchester .. 2. Aaron, son of Cresse of Winchester, and Hagin his brother 3. Hagin, son of Cresse . 4. Elias, son of Hagin . 5. Cok, son of Benedict of Winchester .. 6. Cok of Winchester, and Hagin, son of Popeline .. . 7. Aaron, son of Benedict of Winchester Belaset, daughter of Benedict 9. Aaron of Winchester. 10. Vives of Winchester . 11. Moses le Petyt, son of Master Aaron.. 12. Josce Gilbert, son of Aaron 13. Leoneo, son of Master Elias 14. Josce, son of Ursellus. 15. Aaron, son of Peytevyn. Carried forward</page><page sequence="14">CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. CANTERBURY?continued. 89 BONDS. Brought forward 16. Bele de Stamford of Canterbury 17. Popeline, widow of Abraham Pervas of Bedford 18. Moses, son of Salle . 19. Sampson le Chapeleyn. 20. Isaac Top 21. Abba de Dogestrete . 22. Sarra la Petite. 23. Sarra la Bele . 24. Mowyn . 25. Cok Hagin 26. Community of the Jews of Canterbury From Q.R. 557-, ?455 10 4 120qrs.= 32 0 0 14qrs.= 4 0 0 124 qrs.= 37 13 4 Other Property. 4 Had a house of the value of 30s. a year, for which he paid to the Nuns of St. Sepulchre 6s. 6$., and to the heirs of Jacob de Porta 4s. 6$. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 10 His widow, Joye, had a house in Canterbury of the value of 12s. a year, for which she paid to Christina de Verdur 6s. a year; and another of the value of 18s. 4$. a year, for which she paid to the heirs of Cecily de Handlo 5s. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 11 Had a house of the value of 20s. J$. a year, for which he paid to the heirs of Jacob de Porta 6s. 8%d. a year; and a messuage by the King's Exchange of the value of 19s. 8$. a year, for which he paid to John de H?rders 4s. a year, and to the heirs of Margery Poldre 3s. 8d. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 13 Had a house of the value of 25s. 1$. a year, for which he paid to Thomas Chiceh, 5s. a year, to William le Dopere de Stureye 4s. a year, and to Thomas Durant Id. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and ii, and Lansdowne.) 19 Had a piece of land of the yearly value of 8s. 10$., for which he paid to Margery Poldre 4s. 8d. a year, and to John de Hardres 3s. 2d. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) ao Had a tenement of the yearly value of 4s. 10$., for which he paid to the Prior of Christ Church, Canterbury 2s. 10$. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 81 Had three adjoining tenements, of which the yearly value was one mark together with six hens and one cock, and for which he paid to Alderman De Westgate 2s. 8$. a year, and to the heirs of William Cokyn six hens and one cock. (Q.R. 557-a and 11} and Lansdowne.) 23 Had a house of the yearly value of 4s. 6$., for which she paid to John de Standon 12$. a year, and to Lettice, who was wife of Daniel, 6$. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 23 Had a house of the yearly value of 7s. 7$., for which she paid to the Prior of the Church, of Canterbury 2s. 6$. a year, and to Peter Duraunt 1$. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 24 Had a small piece of land of the yearly value of 17$. which he shared with Peter Duraunt, and for which he paid to the heirs of Thomas de Normanville 18$. a year, and to Mowyn 3$. (sic.) (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 25 Had a part of a house and some land, the annual value of the two being ?1.10s.; he paid to Richard le Joeune on account of them Is. 5$. (Lansdowne.) 26 A Synagogue of the value of 11s. 8$. a year, for which the community paid Margery Poldre 4s. 2$. a year, and Richard le Joeuene 10$. a year; also a piece of land of the annual value of 6$. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.)</page><page sequence="15">90 CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. 1. Sancte 2. Joeeus, son of Samuel 3. Arninus 4. Elias. 5. Dulcia 6. Pigge, son of Dulcia 7. Baeok 8. Simon 9. Hake.. 10. Community of the Jews COLCHESTER. The list of the bonds of the Jews of Colchester is lost. The chest in which the bonds were kept was duly delivered to the Exchequer at Westminster, as recorded in Q.R. 557-10: Henricus Grapmel vicecomes per H?mo nem le Parker clericum suum et Walterus Galigal et Johannes Martyn Cirographarii Arenas Judseorum de Colcestre venerunt et protulerunt ummi forsarium de novis debitis Judeorum de Colcestre sub sigillis Radulfi de Boxstide quondam vicecomitis, Rogeri Baynnard militis, et Oliveri de Colcestre : quod quidem forsarium ponitur in quadam magna Archa in fontaria Regis. Et duae claves dicti forsarii ponuntur in praedicta Pucheta inter alias claves. Protulerunt etiam unam pixidem signatam sigillis prsedictorum Cirographariorum et ponitur in Pucheta inter claves. Other Property. 1 Had a tenement with three shops and one story of the yearly value of 22s. IJgL, for which he paid to the Prior of S. Botolf, Colchester, Is. 2\d. a year ; also a tenement, which was for? merly the synagogue of the Jews, with one shop adjoining, of the yearly value of 7s., for which he paid yearly three suits to the King's hundred, the value whereof is not calculated. He also received yearly 2s. as rent of a tenement which formerly belonged to William Pape. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 2 Had a house near the said Synagogue of the yearly value of 6s. 2d., for which he paid to Oliver, son of Elias, of Colchester, Is. 2d. a year.* (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 3 Had a house of the yearly value of 5s. 6$., for which he paid to Emma de Leycestr' Qd. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) * Had a shop in the market of the yearly value of 6s., for which he paid to Elyas Daniel 3s. a year, and which he let to Robert de Elmham, merchant, for a term of 12 years (of which one year had passed when the Jews departed from England), receiving beforehand payment for the whole term. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 5 and 6 Had a stall with one story, of the yearly value of 7s. a year, for which they paid to Master William Waryn 2s. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and u, and Lansdowne.) * Had a house of the yearly value of 4s. (Q.R. 557-8 and n, and Lansdowne.) 8 Had a house in Stockwell Street of the yearly value of 16d., for which he paid to St. Martin's Church, Colchester, 4d. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and u, and Lansdowne.) 9 Had a house of the yearly value of 42d., for which he paid to Master William Waryn 42$. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and ?, and Lansdowne.) 10 Had a synagogue of the yearly value of 7s. (Lansdowne.) * Perhaps this Joceus may be the same as No. 60 in the Lincoln list.</page><page sequence="16">CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. 91 1. Deulecress, Chaplain 2. Lumbard, son of Deulecress 3. Lumbard, son of Solomon 4. Tercia, widow of Lumbard 5. Copin, son of Lumbard. 6. Symme, son of Lumbard, and Joce fir* Isaac . 7. Samuel, son of Moses. 8. Amite, widow of Samuel, son of Moses 9. Dyaye, son of Samuel, son of Moses .. 10. Jacob, son of Samuel. 11. Moses, son of Samuel .. 12. Moses, son of Josce 13. Isaac, son of Moses 14. Cok, son of Moses. 15. Cok. 16. Aaron, son of Josce 17. Isaac, son of Josce . 18. Leonin, son of Josce . 19. Aaron of Caerleon ., 20. Salomon, son of Aaron. 21. Isaac, son of Solomon. 22. Salaman, son of Salaman 23. Isaac. 24. Isaac de Campeden . 25. Abraham, son of Isaac 26. Abraham. 27. Abraham, son of Miles 28. Jacob, son of Peter 29. Jacob, son of Perez . 30. Jacob Crispin . 31. Abraham and Cok . 32. Amitecote and Abraham 33. " A certain Jew ". 34. Duntere . 35. Antere and Leo 36. Ivote, daughter of Benedict Bateman 37. Jacob Copin . 38. Ursellus, son of Manser. 39. Comitissa. EXETER. BONDS. Money. Corn. All from Q.R. 557-i3 Wool. ?75 16 4 10 0 14 0 0 16 10 0 7 198 4 10 10 5 89 0 1 7 1 0 27 20 20 26 1 4 1 4 4 0 114 2 0 13 357 6 0 13 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 4 15 4 0 8 10 0 2 10 7 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 6 13 0 12 6 0 0 4 0 13 4 13 0 8 0 16 8 ?1,058 4 2 60qrs.= ?20 0 0 60qrs.= 20 0 0 22 qrs.=a 7 6 8 20 qra.= 6 13 4 20qrs.= 6 13 4 190qrs.= 63 6 8 20qrs.= 6 13 4 20 qrs.= 6 13 4 30qrs.= 10 0 0 100qrs.= 33 6 8 ?180 13 4 Other Property. 33 Had a house, in summo vico civitatis, which she bought from Johanna, daughter of Adam le Eseryveyn, and held on condition of paying to the said Johanna and her heirs the sum of 11s. yearly. (Q.R. 557-9.)</page><page sequence="17">92 CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. HEREFORD. BONDS. Money. Corn. Wool. From Q.R. 557-i 1. Aaron, son of Elias le Blund 2. Bonenfaunt of London, son of Aaron of Hereford . 3. Belia, daughter of Aaron 4. Bonamy, son of Aaron. 5. Josse, son of Aaron of Caerleon 6. Elias, son of Aaron . 7. Sarah of Hereford, daughter of Elias of Gloucester. 8. Henne, daughter of Elias 9. Bona, daughter of Elias. 10. Benedict, son of Elias. 11. Elias, son of Benedict. 12. Cuntessa, daughter of Benedict 13. Hagin, son of Elias . 14. Josse, son of Elias le Blund of London 15. Josse, son of Maunser. 16. Maunsellus, son of Josse of Worcester 17. Cok, son of Maunsellus. 18. Isaac of Worcester . 19. Elyas, son of Isaac . 20. Aaron, son of Isaac of Worcester 21. Sampson, son of Isaac of Worcester .. 22. Moses, son of Isaac . 23. Joye, son of Isaac . 24. Mirable, daughter of Isaac 25. Moses, son of Abraham. 26. Cuntessa, daughter of Moses 27. Ursellus, son of Hagin of Gloucester.. 28. Jacob, son of Sadekyn of Hereford .. 29. Hagin, son of Jacob of Gloucester 30. Hagin, son of Belia of Gloucester 31. Gente, daughter of Hagin 32. Hagin, son of Hagin . 33. Hagin de Weobley of Hereford 34. Isaac, son of Hagin de Weobley 35. Isaac, l'Evesque of London 36. Benedict l'Evesque . 37. David, son of Assel . 38. Abraham Chaplain . 39. Elias, son of Jacob . 40. Bonenfaunt, son of Elias, and Isaac, son of Jose . 41. Jose, son of Maunser, and Benedict l'Evesque. 42. Cok de Hereford. 43. Elias de Ardre. 44. Crispin . 45. Community of the Jews of Hereford.. ?879 10 4 123 7 5 2 18 20 4 15 18 4 3 35 13 4 0 0 16 3 2 18 19 25 3 18 3 2 15 27 3 60 0 0 6 8 4 8 16 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 6 8 5 4 0 0 0 0 720?qrs.= ?240 3 4 194?qrs.= 64 16 8 lOqrs.: lqr. = 0 6 8 82qrs.= 27 6 8 ?1,479 5 4 16 sacks=?160 0 0 1 qr. = 0 6 8 100qrs.= 33 6 8 15qrs.= 5 0 0 70qrs.= 23 6 8 60qrs.= 20 0 0 60qrs.= 20 0 0 30qrs.= 10 0 0 30qrs.= 10 0 0 ?458 0 0 ?169 13 4</page><page sequence="18">CONDITION OP THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1280. 93 HEREFORD?continued. Houses and Lands held in Fee or for a Term op Years. 1 Had a tenement with buildings in which he lived of the annual value of 20s. a Tear, and for which he paid to the ferm of Hereford 2s. a year, and a tenement of the annual value of 3s. for which he paid to the ferm of Hereford 2s. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowne.) 2 Had twTo shops of the annual value of 4s. a year, for which he paid to the ferm of Hereford Is. a year, and to the Prior of St. G-uthlac Is. a year, two shops with a story built over them of the value of 4s. a year, and a tenement which he held for a term of four years, having paid in full beforehand. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowme.) 12 Had a messuage with buildings and one shop adjoining of the value of 12s. a year, for which he paid to the ferm of the town of Hereford Is. 6d. a year, and to John, the Goldsmith, 2d. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowne.) 33 Had a house of the yearly value of 6s., for which he paid to ...... Is. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowne.) 42 Had a house with two shops of the yearly value of 15s. M.. for which he paid to the chief lords of the fee 10s. Sd. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowne.) 43 Had a hodse of the yearly value of 4s., for which he paid to the lord of the fee 2s. a year, and another house, in bad condition, which had been pledged to him for 30s. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowne.) Other Property. 44 Had formerly a house in Hereford, which, when he was hanged for felony, fell into the King's hand as an escheat. (Lansdowne.) 45 Had a Synagogue, which with a shop adjacent was of the yearly valu? of 4s., and for which the community paid to the ferm of Hereford Is. a year. (Q.R. 557-a and n, Lansdowne.) IPSWICH. 1. Moses of Suffolk 2. Vlves of Suffolk The list of the Ipswich bonds is lost. The archa was deposited at Westminster, as recorded in Q.R, 557-jo:?Idem Willelmus* vicecomes per predictum Robertum clericum suum et Hugo Gangy unus Ciro graphariorum archae Sudburie venerunt et protulerunt i. archam parvam de veteribus debitis sub sigillis Ricardi de Belhus quondam vicecomitis. Johannis de Oddebourgh, et Johannis Carbonel militum ; et L parvam Archam de novis debitis sub sigillis eorundem Ricardi, Johannis, et Johannis. Et quatuor claves dictarum Archarum ponuntur in supradicta Pucheta etc. El Thomas de SturhulL unus Cirographariorum non venit. Ideo etc. Et dictae Archae ponuntur in quadam magna Archa inter alia minuta in fontaria regis. Et praedictus Hugo Gangy protulit duo scripta, et ponuntur in quadam pixide signata sigillis praedicti Hugonis et ponitur in quadam Pucheta inter alias claves. Other Property. 1 See Nottingham list, No. 13. 3 See Nottingham list, No. 12. * Willelmus de Red ham was sheriff of the two counties of Norfolk and Suffolk.</page><page sequence="19">91 CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. LINCOLN. Corn". All from Q.R. 557-a Wool. 1. Solomon, son of Denlecress of London 2. Belaset of Wallingford, daughter of Solomon. 3. Manser, son of Solomon. 4. Isaac, son of Manser 5. Samuel, son of Manser. 6. Deulecress, son of Solomon of Norwich 7. Elias, son of Deulecress. 8. Hagin, son of Deulecress 9. Jacob, son of Hagin, alias Cok flz' Hagin .. . 10. Deulecress, son of Jacob of London .. 11. Benedict, son of Jacob. 12. Meyr, son of Elias . 13. Aaron, son of Elias . 14. Abraham, son of Elias. 15. Jacob, son of Abraham. 16. Bonne, daughter of Manser .. 17. Meyr, son of Bonne . 18. Avegaye, daughter of Bonne 19. Abraham, son of Dyay. 20. Dyay, son of Dyay . 21. Avigaye, wife of Dyay, the preceding 22. Jacob, son of Sampson Levi 23. Cressy, son of Jacob Levi 24. Ursellus, son of Sampson Levi 25. Sampson, son of Ursellus 26. Samson Levi . 27. Abraham Levi .. 28. Elias, son of Benedict Gubbay.. 29. Josce Gubbay . 30. Josce, son of Samuel of London 31. Josce, son of Peter 32. Josce, son of Bonefy . 33. Leon, son of Josce 34. Floria, daughter of Josce 35. Breton, son of Josce 36. Benedict, son of Josce 37. Bon, son of Josce 38. Benedict, son of Sampson 39. Master Benedict of London Carried forward ?26 6 8 4 13 4 6 13 4 9 6 8 80 0 0 4 0 0 25 0 0 8 13 4 6 13 4 8 0 0 10 0 0 15 0 2 0 0 100 qrs.=?31 13 4 22 sacks=?163 20qrs.= 5 0 0 10 qrs.= 2 10 0 90qrs.= 28 13 4 3qrs.= 10 0 2 qrs.= 0 12 0 162 qrs.= 49 16 8 20 qrs.= 6 13 4 100qrs.= 30 0 0 64 qrs.= 18 13 4 16qrs.= 5 6 8 106qrs.= 28 3 4 6 qrs.= 2 0 0 88 qrs.= 29 6 8 4 qrs.? 16 8 10qrs.= 3 6 8 28qrs.= 9 6 8 20qrs.= 5 0 0 132 qrs.= 41 18 8 ?300 7 4 5 sacks= 33 13 7 sacks = 50 13 I sack =50 1 sack = 6 13 4 sacks = 32 0 13 sacks=106 13 3 sacks = 20 0 0 1? sacks= 15 0 0 1 sack =800 1 sack = 6 13 4 12J sacks=107 0 0 i sack =400 71 sacks = 63 6 8 13J sacks=110 13 4 I sack =368 8 sacks = 56 0 0 1 sack = 6 13 4 3 sacks =s 23 13 4 1 s ck =800 |14| sacks=100 0 0 1 sack =800 6 sacks = 44 14 8 1 sack =800 ? sack =400 1 sack = 6 13 4 5 sacks = 40 0 0 2 sacks = 16 0 0 2 sacks = 16, 0 0 1 sack = 6 13 4 4J sacks= 34 0 0 ?1,114 8 0</page><page sequence="20">CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. LINCOLN?continued. 95 BONDS. Money. Corn. Wool. All from Q.R. 557-*. Brought forward 40. Leon, son of Benedict .. 41. MiJca, fll Benedict.. 42. Lely, fll' Milca. 43. Hen, son of Benedict 44. Hagin, son of Benedict 45. Moses le Evesk. 46. Isaac, son of Moses 47. Moses, son of Isaac of London 48. Miles, son of Isaac 49. Jacob, son of Isaac de Brauncegate 50. Isaac, son of Isaac de Brauncegate 51. Moses, son of Gamaliel ?206 18 4 4 0 0 196 13 4 3 0 0 8 3 4 52. Manser of Bradeworth 53. Manser, son of Samuel. 54. Bonamy, son of Bonamy 55. Peytevin. 56. Joye of Canterbury . 57. Trina, daughter of Dulcia of York . 58. Rose. 59. Jacob de Hedon. 60. .Joceus of Colchester. 61. Mansell de Tykehill . 62. Benedict de Gannok . 63. Benedict le Comte. 64. Judas . 65. Diabella. 66. Hagin Calf. 67. Community of the Jews of Lincoln . 5 0 0 ?423 15 0 ?300 7 4 82 qrs.= 27 6 8 52 qrs... 17 6 570Jqrs.?155 3 80 qrs. , wheat J 80 qrs. 1 barley j 80 qrs. j oats &lt; = 26 13 = 20 0 = 80 30qrs.= 10 0 6 qrs.= 0 12 12 qrs.= 3 o 30qrs.= 10 0 80qrs.= 20 0 10 qrs.= 3 0 ?1, 1? sacks = 1 sack = I sack &amp; 8 stone ? pack = 6 sacks= 2 sacks sb 19 sacks= 21 sacks= 1 sack = 2 sacks= 114 10 5 = 5 3 : 14 144 162 8 13 &gt;5 sacks= 2 sacks = 10 13 1 sack = 2 sacks= ; 13 i 13 ?1,595 6 0 Other Property. 1 Had two small houses in Brauncegate of the annual value of 6s., for which he paid to the King Id. a year. (Q.R. 557-8 and ?, and Lansdowne.) Also houses of the value of 12s. a year. (Lansdowne.) 2 Had a house of the clear annual value of 19s. 6d. (Lansdowne.) (Perhaps this Belaset is the same as No. 1 in the Stamford list.)</page><page sequence="21">96 CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. LINCOLN?continued. 22 Had a messuage of the value of 16s. a year, for which he paid to the King Id. a year and to the Prior of Torkes 1 mark a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) ^ Had a messuage of the value of 8s. a year, for which he paid to the King Id. a year, and to Osbert le Lung Id. a year. (Q.R. 557-., and ?, and Lansdowne.) 28 Had a messuage (namely, a small cottage) of the value of 2s. a year, for which he paid to the King Id. and to John Stoyl 4s. a year (sic). (Q.R. 557-9 and ?, and Lansdowne.) 29 Had a messuage, a very good house, with a copse, and six shops, of the yearly value of 20s., for which he paid to the King Id. a year, and to the Mother Church of Lincoln 2s. a year. (Q.R. 557 9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 34 Had a messnage of the value of 30s. a year in St. Martin's parish (optima domus cum duabus shopis et pulcro exitu), occupied by Willi im le Belliget, for which she paid to the King Id. a year ; also a messuage of the value of 6s. a year, for which she paid to the King Id. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 39 Had three messuages of the value of 40s. a yoar, in which he lived, and for which he paid to the King 2d. and to the Mother Church of St. Mary's, Lincoln, 21s. 4d. n year ; also a messuage in Brauncegate, with two shops and tenement, well built, of the yearly value of 5s. a year, for which he paid to the King Id. and to St. Lazarus' Hospital 15s. a year (sic). (Q.R. 557-?, and ii, and Lansdowne.) 44 Had a messuage in St. Martin's parish, mediocris domvs, of the annual value of 6s. (Lansdowne), for which he paid to the King Id. a year and to Adam Ack 9s. (sic) ; also a messuage, which w*s held by G-ersy, Jew, of the annual value of 1 mark ; also a plot of land, in which Iiis kitchen was built, and for which he paid a yearly rental to the Prior and Brethren of S. Katharine without Lincoln. (Q.R. 557-9 and n.) 49 Had a messuage in Brauncegate, a good house, well built, of the yearly value of one mark, for which he paid the King Id. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 52 Had a messuage in Brauncegate, a good house, well built, of the yearly value of one mark, for which he paid the King Id. a year, and another messuage in Brauncegate, in which John de Norwich lived, of the value of 10s. a year, for which he paid to the King Id. a year and to the Prioress of Hegning 1 pound of cummin. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 56 See Canterbury list, No. 10. Footnote. eo Had tenements in Brauncegate, good houses, well built, with two chambers, of the yearly value of 12s., for which he paid to the King Id. a year, and to Alice, wife of Nich' de O-tre, 3s Id. (Q.R. 557-9 and n.) (Perhaps this Joceus may be the same as No. 2 on the Colchester list.) mi Had a small cottage, in bad repair, of the yearly value of 3s., for which he paid to the King Id. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n.) 62 Had two high houses, well built and roofed with tiles, of the annual value of 20s., for which he paid to the King Id. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and u.) 63 Had a messuage of the value of I8d. a year, and a vacant plot belonging to it of the value of 12d. a year, for which he paid to the King Id. a year, to Osbert le Lung Id. a year, to Wil? liam de Hepham 5s. a year (sic), and to the Prior of Drax 2s. a year (sic). (Q.R. 557-9 and ii, and Lansdowne.) ?* Had good houses, with one shop and two well-built chambers, in the bailiwick of Lincoln, of the yearly value of 13s. 4d. (Q.R. 557-9 and n.) 65 Had a tenement of the yearly value of 8s. (Q.R. 557-9 and u.) 6fi Had houses yielding 12d. of rent, also a small piece of lard. (Lansdowne ) 6* See York list, No. 6. Footnote.</page><page sequence="22">CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. 97 1. Leo, son of Cresse, son of Elias 2. Abraham Motonn, and Benedict, son of Mayer. 3. Heirs of Elias, son of Moses 4. Muriel, daughter of Cresse, son of Gente. 5. Aaron, son of Slemme. 6. Benedict, son of Jacobus Clericus 7. Thippa, wife of Isaac of Southwark .. 8. Jorvin Sakerel. 9. Elias le Evesk . 10. Benedict, son of Hagin and Rose Anteman . 11. Sara Diei. 12. Moses, son of Master Elias 13. Auntere, widow of Vives, son of Master Moses. 14. Manser, son of Aaron. 15. Elias Baggard . 16. Moses Crespin . 17. Jacob, son of Bonamy of York.. 18. Gamaliel of Exeter, and Bateman, son of Cresse .. .. . 19. Sarah of Oxford .. . 20. Community of Jews of London LONDON. No list of the bonds in the London archa is pre? served. The bonds were brought to "Westminster, in accordance with the orders contained in the writ quoted above, and the list must have been lost. The delivery of the bonds at the Exchequer is recorded as follows (Q. R., 557-io) :?Vicecomes Londinii et Radulf us le Blunt et Willelmus de Betoyne Cirographarii Londinii tulerunt imam archam novam de novis debitis Judeorum, et unam pocketam cum quinque pixidibus et uno scripto extra pixidem cum duabus clavibus sub sigillis predictorum vicecomitis et cyrographariorum : et praeterea Rogeras Crok liberavit unam pixidem cum quodam scripto obligatorio in eadem. Other Property. 1 Had houses and appurtenances valued at four marks. (Lansdowne.) 2 Had houses valued at ?2. 6s. 8d. (Lansdowne.) 3 Had a piece of land valued at half mark. (Lansdowne.) 4 Had houses valued at ?2.10s. (Lansdowne.) 5 Had houses valued at ?2. (Lansdowne.) 6 Had houses valued at ?1. 6s. 6d. (Lansdowne.) * Had houses and appurtenances valued at 6s. 8d. (Lansdowne.) 8 Had houses and appurtenances valued at ?3. 18s. 9d. (Lansdowne.) 9 Had houses, tenements and appurtenances valued at ?6.17s. 4d. (Lansdowne.) 10 Had houses valued at ?1. 2s. 8d. (Lansdowne.) 11 Had houses and tenements valued at ?2.18s. 8d. (Lansdowne.) 12 Had houses valued at four marks. (Lansdowne.) 13 Had houses and appurtenances valued at ?12. 17s. (Lansdowne.) 14 Had houses and appurtenances valued at ?6.13s. 4d. (Lansdowne.) 15 Had houses and appurtenances, value not stated. (Lansdowne.) 16 Had houses and appurtenances valued at ?3. 19s. (Lausdowne.) 17 Had houses and appurtenances valued at ?3. (Lansdowne.) 18 Had houses and tenements valued at ?2.10s. (Lansdowne.) 19 Had houses of the value of ?7 a year. (Lansdowne.) 20 Had lands and houses valued at 8s. 8d. (Lansdowne.) Also a cemetery valued at 40s. (Lansdowne.) VOL. II. H</page><page sequence="23">98 CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. NORTHAMPTON. 1. Moses, son of Jacob . 2. Pictavinus, son of Sampson 3. Gente, who was wife of Sadekyn 4. Sara of London. 5. Benedict de Gellario . 6. Community of Jews of Northampton. The list of Northampton bonds has been lost. The delivery of the archa at Westminster is recorded in Q.R. 557-xo:?Vicecomes venit per Robertnm de Lathe bur', clericum suum, et tulit unam Archam novam de novis debilis et aliam veterem, etc. Et Philippus de Hotton et Johannes le Megre Cirographarii non vene runt. Ideo, etc., nec claves, etc. Et praedicta archa nova sigillata fuit sub sigillis vicecomitis Roberti filii Walteri et Willelmi Butemleyn militum et vetus archa sigillata fuit sub sigillis Abbatis Sancti Ja'-obi Nor hamtune et Roberti fllii Henrici Burgensis Norhamtune. Et postea venit praedictus Johannes le Megre unus Cyrographariorum et protulit duas claves dictae novae Archae et ponuntur in quadam puchetta inter alias claves. Other Property. 1 Had a messnage on " le Cornrowe " of Northampton of the yearly value of 27s. 8d., for which he paid to Philip le Chaumpyn, 4$. a year and to the reeveship of Northampton 8d. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowne.) 2 Had a messnage in the Sheepmarket (bona domus cum aisiamentis omnibus necessariis competen tibus et bene edificatis) of the yearly value of 21s. 2d., for which he paid to the reeveship of Northampton 2s. a year, to Ralph de Selvesto? 12$. a year, and to John Gange 2d. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and u, and Lansdowne.) 3 Had a cottage in very bad repair, with a small yard, together of the yearly value of 6s., for which she paid to the heirs of John de Thorp 4s. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 4 Had a house with one story and a cellar, in good condition, of the yearly value of one mark, for which she paid to the abbot of S. James Without Northampton, 6s. 8d. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and ii, and Lansdowne.) 5 Had a tenem nt which he had bought for a term of seven years, of which three years had elapsed when the Jews departed from England. (Q.R. 557-9 and n.) c Had five houses, five cottages, with curtilages belonging to three, a p^ce of land that was used as a cemeter.v,an annual rent of 4s. from houses in the town of Stamford towards the upkeep of the cemetery, and a synagogue. The annual value of the buildings was ?1. Os. 9$. and 1 lb. of cumin, less Is. 5&lt;Z. paid to the Prior and Monastery of St. Andrew'*, Northampton, 8d. paid to the reeveship of Northampton, 2s. and 1 lb. of cumin paid to the Abbot of St. James Without Northampton^ and 8d. paid to Thomas de Sartus. The value of the cemetery was half a mark a year, and this sum was paid to the Prior of S. Andrews. The stones of the wall round the cemetery were worth 30s. for carting away. (Q.R. 557-9 and u, and Lans? downe.)</page><page sequence="24">CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. 99 NORWICH. Deulecress, son of Abraham of York. Isaac, son of Deulecress. Pateman, the doctor, son of Deulecress Abraham, son of Ursellus of York Cress, son of Abraham of York Isaac, son of Abraham of Rising Josce, son of Ursellus of York .. Elias, son of Elias of Canterbury Cress, son of Sampson, of York Isaac, son of Samuel, the Chaplain Belia, widow of Jacob .. Jacob de Clare Gente of Gloucester, Jewess Isaac de Gernemuth Joceus, son of Deulecress Miles Kat. Anonymous Community of Jews BONDS. Money. ?8 13 4 3 6 8 Corn. Wool. From Q.R. 557-! 10 qrs.= ?3 6 8 470 qrs.= 156 13 4 56 qrs.= 17 0 0 12 qrs.= 2 13 4 50 qrs.= 10 16 8 60 qrs. 60 qrs. 30 qrs. 232 qrs. 26 qrs. ? 17 10 0 .= 13 6 8 = 10 0 0 ,= 76 16 8 = 6 10 0 ?314 13 4 1 sack = 26 sacks= 3 sack*= 2 sacks= 5 facks= 2 sacks= 9 sacks= ?5 0 0 170 0 0 : 18 6 8 13 6 8 33 6 8 11 1-3 4 0 0 ?311 13 4 Other Property. 2 Had a messuage of tbe value of 17s. 5d. a year, for which he paid to John de Wylton 9s. 4d. a year, and to the land tax Id. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and u, Lansdowne.) 4 Had a messuage of the value of 6s. 10d., for which he paid to Roger de Tudenham |d. a year, to John Bate Jd., to Jacob de Winton |d., towards the King's land tax Id. (Q R. 557-, and n, Lansdowne.) 8 Had a messuage of the value of 7s. 4jd. a year, for which he paid to John Chese Is. 4d. a year, for the land tax ?d. a year, and to Adam de Testes 4d. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowne.) 10 Had a messuage of the value of 2s. 6d a year, for which he paid to Jacob Nade 6d. a year, and to the sheriff for the King's land tax 2s. a year. (Q.R. 557-a and u, Lansdowne.) 13 Had a messuage of the yearly value of 5s. IJd., for which she paid to the land tax ?d. a year. (Q.R. 557-a and n, Lansdowne.) 14 Had a messuage of the value of 7s. 8d. a year, for which he paid to Henry le Meier Is. 4d. a year, to Henry Sparewe Is. 4d. a year, and to the land tax 4d. a year. (Q R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowne.) 15 Had a hou?e of the value of 9s. 8^d. a year, for which he paid to the land tax Jd. a year, and to the Nuns of Carhowe 3s. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and u, Lansdowne.) 16 Had a house of the yearly value of 8s. 1 Jd., for which he paid to Robert de Byry, lorimer, l|d. a year, and to St. Giles'' Hospital 2s. a year. (Q.R. 557-0 and n, Lansdowne.) 18 Had a synagogue of the yearly value of 5s. for which they paid 4d. to the land tax. (Q.R. 557-? and ?, Lansdowne.) Ii 2</page><page sequence="25">100 CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. NOTTINGHAM. Money. Cohn. From QJl. 557-, Bateman, son of Cress, of Stamford Pictavinus, son of Bateman Ursellus, son of Bateman Hagin, son of Bateman Moses de Clare, of Suffolk Isaac, son of Moses, of Suffolk .. Gente, son of Moses, of Suffolk Cresse, son of Gente Isaac de Provincia Floria, daughter of Isaac de Provencia Moses, gendre of Isaac de Provincia Moses, son of Moses of Suffolk.. Yives de Suffolk. Abraham, son of Belia Abraham Rowell. Cress', son of Jacob Josce, son of Phille Bonamico, son of Bunne Leo, son of Maunsellus Deudo Crispin . Community of the Jews at Nottingham ?13 4 0 2 0 0 4 0 0 36 13 0 63 14 0 20 0 0 80 0 0 5 0 0 10 3 4 22 13 4 26 13 4 2 13 4 12 0 0 20 0 0 120 6 8 10 qrs.= ?2 10 0 50qrs.= 12 0 0 20qrs.= 5 0 0 30qrs.= 10 0 0 6 qrs.= 2 0 0 ? qrs.= 2 10 0 ?34 0 0 ?13 6 8 5sacks= 23 6 8 Other Property. 2 Pictavinus and Elias his son had a messuage of the value of 7s. Id. a year, for which they paid to the chief lords of the fee 4s. Id. a year. (Q.R. 55-79 and u, Lansdowne.) 5 Had a messuage in Ipswich of the value of 5s. 2$. a year, for which he paid to Simon, son of Simon, 12$., and to Walter Michael 2d.; and a messuage in Nottingham of the value of 6s. Id. a year, for which he paid to the chief lords of the fee 2s. Id. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and ?, Lansdowne.) 13 Had a messuage in Ipswich of the value of 10s. a year, for which he paid to Robert de Wylashaw 12$. a year, and a yard in the suburb of Ip-wich of the value of 6$. a year, for which he paid to John de la Bere |$. year. (Q.R. 557-9, Lansdowne.) 21 Had a synagogue of the annual value of 3s. 11$., for which the community paid to the ferm of Nottingham Is. 4$., and to the chief lords of the fee (who were unknown to the Jurors before whom the information concerning the property of the expelled Jews was furnished), 1$. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and ?, Lansdowne.)</page><page sequence="26">CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF OXFORD. ENGLAND IN 1290. 101 1. Bonefey, son of Lumbard of Cricklade 2. Vives le Petit, son of Bonefey 3. Miles, son of Bonefey de Crikelade .. 4. Simon of Cricklade . 5. Leo, son of Manser . 6. Manser, son of Leo . 7. Margalicia widow of Vives of Glou? cester . 8. Vives, Jew of Gloucester, living at Oxford. 9. Yives le Chapelyn. , . 10. Josce of Newbury. 11. Isaac le Gendre Lumbard 12. Simon de la Haye. 13. Isaac, son of Salaman. 3 4. Isaac, son of Aaron of Worcester 15. Rose la Veuve . 16. No name .. .. . 17. Floria la Vedue. 18. Sarah, who was wife of Benedict le Eveske .. 19. Samuel de Berkhampstede 20. Avegaye, daughter of Benedict of Winchester . 21. Pya, who was wife of Benedict de Caus 22. Benedict de la Cornere. 23. Moses, son of Jacob of London 24. Community of the Jews of Oxford .. BONDS. Money. ?16 0 Corn. ?30 1 4 From Q.R. 557-2 395qrs.= ?131 5 0 80qrs.= 25 0 0 24 qrs.= 8 0 0 20 qrs.= 6 13 4 8 qrs.= 2 13 4 40 qrs.= 33 qrs.= 24 qrs.= 130 qrs.= 20 qrs.? 80 qrs.= 15 qrs.= 20 qrs.= 13 6 8 11 0 0 8 0 0 37 10 0 6 13 4 26 13 4 5 0 0 3 6 8 ?285 1 8 2sacks=?l00 13 4 2 sacks = 10 0 0 2 sacks = 13 6 8 1 sack = 6 13 4 2 sacks = 20 0 0 Other Property. 1 Had a messuage with shop adjoining of the value of 26s. 8$. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, Lans? downe.) * Had a messuage and shop of the annual value of 25s. 5$., for which she paid to John the Gold? smith Is. 3d. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and llf Lansdowne.) 17 Had a messuage in St. Aldate's parish of the yearly value of 16s., for which she paid to St. Bartholomew's Hospital without Oxford 18$. a year, and to Thomas de Henseheye 12$. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and X1, Lansdowne.) 18 Had a messuage with a hall and four shops in St. Aldate's parish, of the yearly value of 4 marks, for which she paid to the Converts of London, by assignment of the king, 10s. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowne,) 19 Had a house in St. Aldate's parish of the yearly value of 9s. 7|$., for which he paid to the ferm of the borough of Oxford 4|$. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and IX, Lansdowne.) 20 Had a house of the value of 10s. 7f$. a year, for which she paid to the ferm of the borough of Oxford 4!$. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowne.) 21 Had a messuage near to the last mentioned, and one shop under the same roof in St. Aldate's parish, of the yearly value of 27s., for which she paid to the Abbot of Abingdon 12$. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and u, Lansdowne.) 22 Had a messuage with a cellar in St. Aldate's parish of the yearly value of 24s., for which ho paid to the heirs of "Walter Feteplaee 3s. 4$. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and u, Lansdowne.) 23 Had a messuage, with shop adjoining, near the Synagogue in St. Aldate's parish, of which the yearly value was 18s. 9$. a year, and for which he paid to the Prior and Convent of St. Prideswide's 17s. 2d. a year, and to John the Goldsmith, of Oxford, Is. 3$. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowne.) 3* Had a Synagogue in the parish of St. Aldate's of the yearly value of 18s. 9$., for which they paid to the Prior and Monastery of St, Frideswide, 2$. a year, and to John the Goldsmith Is. 3$. a year. (Q.R. 557-3 and ?.)</page><page sequence="27">102 CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. SOUTHAMPTON. BONDS. Money. Wool. All from Q.R. 557-2 Yives, son of Aaron of London Sleme, widow of Vives, son of Aaron of London . Lumbard, son of Deulegard of Win? chester. Hannah, daughter of Lumbard Sweetman, son of Licoricia of Win? chester . Abraham, son of Cressant Abraham Cokerel . Joceus . . Jacob, son of Cokerel. Lumbard, son of Belia. Cok, son of Lumbard. Duteman. Beycot . Floria. Samme (subsequently converted) Cressaunt. Community of the Jews at Winchester 100qrs.= ?25 0 0 190qrs.= 63 6 8 90qrs.= 30 0 0 24qrs.= 8 0 0 18qrs.= 3 12 0 2 sacks = ?10 0 0 40 0 0 ?50 0 0 Other Property. 3 Had a house in Winchester of the yearly value of 12s. 6d., and one pair of gloves, for which he paid to Robert Poceril and John Moraunt annually 6d. and one pair of gloves. (Q.R. 557 9 and ii, and Lansdowne.) 6 Had a house in Winchester of the yearly value of 10s. 2d., for which he paid to the ferm of Winchester 2d. a year, and a tenement of the yearly value of 3s., for which he paid to the ferm of Winchester 2d. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and h, Lansdowne.) * Had a house in Winchester of the value of 11s. 3d. a year, for which he paid to the Abbot of Hyde Is. 3d. a year, and also held, together with Joceus, a small house with a yard of the value of 4s. 3d. a year, for which he paid to the Abbot of Hyde Is. 3d. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and ii, Lansdowne.) 6 See the preceding name. 9 Had a tenement in Winchester with scola of the annual value of 16s. 6d. a year, for which he paid to the Abbot of Hyde 2s. 6d. a year for land tax. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowne.) 10 Had an old house in Winchester of the value of 18d. a year, for which he paid to the King 6d. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and u, Lansdowne.) 11 Had a house in Winchester of the annual value of 42d. a year, for which he paid to the ferm of Winchester 21d. a year. (Q.R. 357-9 and u, Lansdowne.) 12 Had a small house in Winchester of the value of 2s. 6d. a year, for which he paid to the Brother? hood of Ecklende 2s. a year for land tax. (Q,R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowne.) 18 and 14 Had a house in Winchester of the annual value of 7s. a year, for which they paid " to the King, to the ferm of Winchester," 4s. a year. (Q R. 557-9 and u, Lansdowne.) 15 Had a house in Winchester, for which he paid to the parson of St. Martin's Church 4s. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and u.) 18 Had a house in Winchester of the yearly value of 15s. 5d., for which he paid to the heirs of John Charice 2s. and to the Prior of St. Swithin's 5d. (Q.R. 557-9 and u, Lmsdowne.) 17 Had land of the yearly value of 2s. 6d., which was held from the Prior of St. Swithin's at a rent of 2s. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, lansdowne.) Also a stone of the value of 4s., on which the Jews washed corpses before burial, (Q.R. 557-9 and n.)</page><page sequence="28">CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. 103 STAMFORD. 1. Belaset 2. Reyne, who was wife of David .. 3. Tony, son of Meyr. It seems doubtful whether there was an arena at Stamford for the bonds of the Jews who lived there. There is no record of the existence of one. 1 Had a messuage in St. Michael's parish, of the yearly value of 3s. 6d., for which she paid to Roger de Offlnton 6d. a year, and another messuage in St. John's parish, of the yearly value of 6.9., for which she paid to Emma, who was wife of Bartholomew le Cordwaner 3s. 6d. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and XJ, Lansdowne.) Perhaps this Belaset is the same as No. 2 in the Lincoln list. 2 Had a house in the parish of All Saints, of the yearly value of 2s. for which she paid to Gilbert de Oesterton 18s. a year (sic).* (Q.R. 557-9 and n, Lansdowne.) 3 Had a story in All Saints' Parish of the yearly value of 2s. for which he paid to the King Id. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and n.) WARWICK. There seems to have been in existence in 1290 a chest supposed to contain bonds belonging to Jews of Warwickshire. The manuscript Q.R. 557-io ends with the following entry:?Warrwicus? Arch' cirographorum de veteribus debitis. The only other references to Jews living in Warwick? shire before 1290 with which I am acquainted are to be found in the name list given in Mr. Jacobs' Jews of Angevin England, pp. 345-369. WILTSHIRE. Money. BONDS. All from Q.R. 557. wool. 1. Salaman, son of Simon of Marlborough, known as Cok le Riehe 2. Simon, son of Salaman of Marlborough 3. Jacob, son of Salaman of Marlborough 4. Lumbard, son of Salaman of Marl? borough . 5. Colette, daughter of Salaman 6. Jospin, son of Salaman of Marlborough 7. Henne, daughter of Jospin 8. Josce, son of Salaman [see 557-n] of Marlborough. 9. Josce, son of Josce . 10. Elyas, son of Josce . 11. Lumbard, son of Josce. Carried forward ?14 0 0 9 0 0 23 10 0 4 0 0 11 10 7? 8 13 4 6 0 0 10 0 7 0 0 2 0 0 ?86 13 11J 196qrs.= ?65 6 8 30qrs.= 10 0 0 20 qrs.= 6 13 4 10qrs.= 2 0 0 ?84 0 0 * As the clear value to the King of this property, when confiscated, is given at 2s. a year, the yearly value of the house was no doubt 20s. (not 2s. as stated), the value of the Jewess' interest, after payment of the rent of 18s., being 2s. a year.</page><page sequence="29">104 CONDITION OF THE JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. WILTSHIRE?continued. Brought forward 12. Isaac of Fairfax, son of Benjamin 13. Enne, daughter of Yives of Marlborough 14. Sadekyn,son of Abraham of Marlborough 15. Salomon, son of Abraham Badeeock .. 16. Henne, daughter of Hagin 17. Benedict of Chippenham 18. Isaac, son of Deudo of Calne 19. Salomon, son of Michael of Dorset .. 20. Lumbard of Cricklade. 21. Lnmbard, son of Abraham of Kent .. 22. J. de Newbyr 23. Sweteman, son of David of Oxford .. 24. Benedict, son of Elias of Chippenham 25. Anonymous . 26. Cok. Money. ?86 13 11| 8 0 0 6 13 4 6 13 4 4 0 0 0 18 0 4 0 19 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 22 6 8 140 0 0 2 0 0 3 18 0 0 13 1 ?309 19 8J BONDS. Corn. Wool. All from Q.R. 557. ?84 0 0 4 qrs.= 1 6 ?85 6 8 Other Property. 8 Had a tenement in Devizes of the value of 4s. a year, which he bought from William Ohyverel for a term of six years for half a mark, paying to the said William 4s. a year. At the time when the Jews were ordered to depart from England 3J years of the six had elapsed. (Q.R. 557-9 and n.) 26 Had a tenement in Devizes of the value of 4s. 8d. a year, for which he paid to the chief lord of the fee 8d. a year; and he had had for a t?rm of 15 years another house of the value of 13s. 5d, a year, for which he paid to the chief lord of the fee ljd. a year, and when the Jews were ordered to depart from England, five years of the term had elapsed, and he sold his rights for the other 10 years to Henry Lay, cobbler, from whom he bought the house.* (Q.R. 557-9 and ?.) WORCESTER. Although the Jewish community of Worcester had ceased to exist some years before the expulsion,! a chest supposed to contain the bonds of the Jews who had formerly lived in the city was presented at the Exchequer at Westminster at the same time as the chests in which the extant bonds were kept. No list of the contents is preserved, and perhaps the chest was empty. The record of its delivery is contained in Q.R. 557-io:?Adam de la Holilomae et Johannes de Lodelowe venerunt die Mercurii proxima ante festum Sancti Edmundi Regis et Martiris pro Willelmo Rocolf et Waltero Oeynterell ballivis civitatis Wygornise; et tulerunt unam Archam de veteribus debitis sub sigillo prioris Wygornise et sigillis aliorum quorum nomina ignorant: et nullam clavem secum tulerunt: et dicunt quod Payn Burgenis et Johannes Alisaundre qui fuerunt Cirographarii predictae arcliae et clerici eorum mortui sunt. * These houses are described as the property of Cok the Jew. Cok referred to may be No. 26, to whom I have assigned them; or it may be No. 1, Salaman, son of Simon, " known as Cok le Riehe " (see above); or No. 1 and No. 26 may be the same person. t Judaei Wigorn' usque ad villam nostram Hereford . . . cum archis cyrographorum suorum et cum omnibus bonis suis transferantur.?Papers read at the Anglo-Jewish Historical Exhibition, p. 188, note. Members of Jewish families of Worcester are mentioned as owners of bonds kept in the Hereford and Oxford Archae. Vide Supr?.</page><page sequence="30">CONDITION OF 1. Bonamicus. 2. Cok, son of Aaron 3. Sarah, widow of Benedict 4. Joceus, son of Benedict .. 5. Moses, son of Bonef ey 6. Moses le Veil 7. Community of Jews of York JEWS OF ENGLAND IN 1290. 105 YORK. The list of the bonds of the Jews of York is lost. The archa in which the bonds were kept was duly deposited at the Exchequer at Westminster, as recorded in Q.R. 557-10:?Vicecomes venit per Henricum Bar thelemeum, clericum suum, et tulit unam archam de veteribus debitis, sigillatam sigillis Abbatis de Eboraco et Johannis de Litegrene tuoc vicecomitis et aliorum quorum nomina ignorat: et aliam archam de novia debitis signatam sigillis Johannis de Segate, Ivonia Delton' militum, et Gervasii de Clipton' vicecomitis. Et Johannes le Dessus' et Thomas de Benyngboigh Ciro grapharii non venerunt. Ideo, etc. Et nec clavea dictarum archarum miserunt. 1 Had a messuage in Conystrete, of the yearly value of 4 marks, in which he lived, and for which he paid to the ferm of York for house tax \d. a year, to the heirs of John Paynel 2s., to John de Selby Id., and to John de Stoketon Id. Also another tenement in Conystrete of the yearly value of 4 marks 12 shillings, formerly the property of Joceus of Kent and after? wards occupied by Joceus the son of Bonamicus, for which Bonamicus paid to the King 2d. a year for house tax, and to Thomas Baudewyn Is. 4d. a year ; also a messuage in Metsgate Street of the yearly value of 33s. 4d.. in which Benectus, his son, lived, and for which Bonamicus paid to the King 2d. a year for house-tax, to the Hospital of St. Leonard of York 2s. a year, and to the heirs ( f Thomas Fayrefax 4s. 6d. a year; also a yearly rent of 4s. and 1 lb. of pepper, which he held in fee of John Basy, issuing from a house of the said John in Feltergayte Street. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 2 Had a messuage in Conystrete of which all the cellars and the ground beneath the house towards Conystrete belonged to Laurence de Bonthun and his heirs. The yearly value of the tenement above the cellars was 40s., and Cok paid to the King for house-tax 2\d. a year, and to Laurence de Bonthun 6s. Sd. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and u, Lansdowne.) 3 and * Had a tenement of the yearly value of 5 marks, for which they paid to the King for house-tax 2d. a year, and to Laurence de Bonthun 2s. a year. They let the tenement to Agnes la Gra for a term of ten years, of which eight had elapsed at Whitsuntide, 18 Edward I. (Q.R. 55f-9 and n, and Lansdowne.) 5 Had a messuage in Metsgate Street of the yearly value of 40s., for which he paid to the King 2d. a year for house-tax, and to the Hospital of St. Leonard of York 2s. a year. (Q.R. 557-9 and ii, and Lansdowne.) 6 Had houses in York, value not stated. (Lansdowne.) ? Had, in common with the Jews of Lincoln, a plot of land called le Jeubury, which they used as a cemetery. Also a house and land adjoining. The yearly value of the house and land was 20s., and the community paid lid. for house tax to the King (a year), 2s. a year to the Vicars of St. Peter's Church, York, and Id. a year to the Prior of Holy Trinity, York. (Q.R. 557-9 and n, and Lansdowne.)</page></plain_text>