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Book Notes: From Strangers to Citizens. The Integration of Immigrant Communities in Britain, Ireland and Colonial America, 1550-1750, Randolph Vigne and Charles Littleton (eds.)

Malcolm Brown

<plain_text><page sequence="1">From Strangers to Citizens. The Integration of Immigrant Commu? nities in Britain, Ireland and Colonial America, 1550-1750, Randolph Vigne and Charles Littleton (eds) (The Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland, London, and Sussex Academic Press, Brighton 2001) ISBN 1 902210-85-9. xxiv and 567 pp. ?49.50. As reported in the general press and our Bulletin, in April 2000 the Huguenot Society convened to celebrate the 450th anniversary of a charter granted by Edward VI to give immigrants and refugees - 'strangers' - the right to hold Reformed services in their own places of worship in England. This volume of conference proceedings includes fifty-seven papers grouped in nine parts, of which one entitled 'The "Other" in Protestant England' contains three items of specific Jewish interest contributed by Michael Berkowitz, Gordon M. Weiner and Edgar Samuel, the last of whom also served on the conference planning committee. Considerations of space prevent more than a brief men? tion of three further papers, Geoffrey Cantor on Emanuel da Costa, Yitzchak Kerem on Sephardi settlement in British colonial America and Natalie Rothstein on Huguenot weavers. As with all such volumes, readers can be 229</page><page sequence="2">Book Notes sure to find much of value among the exceptionally wide range of topics covered. It is a pleasure to salute scholarly research presented so attractively by a society eight years our senior and whose publications have in several instances provided guidelines for our own. Malcolm Brown 230</page></plain_text>